Houses with Desert Masonry

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Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4349
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Roderick,
That link does not work.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 19627
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

File not found.

I guess this is the book I referred to -- I no longer recall.

http://www.amazon.com/Ranch-Houses-Livi ... 0847831825

SDR

therman7g
Posts: 264
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 11:14 am
Location: Illinois

Post by therman7g »


SDR
Posts: 19627
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Thanks. Is that the house I indicated, three years ago ? Must be getting old. I wonder if this structure is still in place. Those vacant hills are surely crowded with other construction, by now . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10301
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

therman7g, that's the house.

FLWLAB
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 1:31 pm

Originally Designed for Rubblestone

Post by FLWLAB »

I am joining this discussion string late, so this may duplicative of something already submitted, but I wanted to mention that the Walker House in Carmel, CA was originally intended to be desert rubblestone. In fact, Mark Mills was assigned to do the job given his proficiency with rubblestone. Ultimately, Carmel Stone was used instead (native to the area). However, I believe that rubblestone may be under the Carmel Stone (but I'm not certain; don't quote me).

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

I doubt one would find desert masonry under the stone, but one might find that lower level with the circular stair revealed only in "A Summer Place."

CEP
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 3:56 pm

Post by CEP »

Re: the Walker house - here's a few fairly recent pictures showing the eastern side wall which differs from the stone used on the house proper (and one nice sunset shot):
Image; Image; Image; Image; Image

DRN
Posts: 3982
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Thanks for posting these pics of Walker, CEP.

The house design in and of itself is good, but its dramatic siting, perched on the rocks just above the shore is what captures the imagination. Is it the scenario of shelter from the storm, or is it the back of the mind knowledge that there is a real element of danger in being in this house knowing that at some point in the future a tsunami will reach this shore once again? Wright's sand castle, perhaps?

I just noticed the concrete wash on the top surface of the rocks, presumably to minimize erosion and to allow splashed water to more readily flow away?

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The stonework of the additional wall is unfortunate. In order to differentiate the wall from original construction, it would have been better if it had been concrete with a slight indentation where it joins the house to set the new construction apart from the old. Now one can only plant vines ... which would have a tough time surviving.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Indeed. The plan geometry of the wall doesn't seem to relate to that of the original construction, as well.

The added stone wall (enclosing a second terrace ?) has been in place for sone years, I gather.

Image
(It appears that this satellite view was "stitched" at an unfortunate place, adding some extra wrinkles to Wright's hexagonal roof shape.)

Image

KevinW
Posts: 1287
Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

Post by KevinW »

Earl Nisbet used desert masonry type walls in some of his own projects.

http://www.ced.berkeley.edu/cedarchives ... isbet.html
KevinW

JPB_1971
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:50 am

Post by JPB_1971 »

I wonder why the additional wall was not built to match the Carmel stone of the house? It is not a big wall so I wouldn't think availability of materials would be an issue - maybe just lack of sensitivity to the original materials?

At least the grouting on the rocks in front of the house appears to have been colored to give the impression of sand/soil.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Current standards, for reasons I find spurious, say that additions to buildings should not blend seamlessly to avoid appearing to be original. I think that was the point of the change of material, construction and that curve at the end. Nevertheless, earlier, when the master bedroom was greatly expanded, the stonework, along with every other aspect of the design, blended perfectly with the original.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

It seems a curious turn of events, that when we restore or add to a significant work of architecture we are now bidden to spoil it for reasons of academic clarity.

If we can send examples of human activity -- art, music, mathematics, etc -- into outer space, for the edification of present or future civilizations unknown -- and bury time capsules here on Earth for the same reasons -- we might find a way to alert historians and forensic anthropologists of the future that a given building was designed thus, and modified thus, and when and by whom, without recourse to crude mangling of the historic fabric itself . . . ?

SDR

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