FLW-designed William F. Ross House price reduced

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outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

thank you - now that most of the peculiar additions to the house have been removed (except for the entry box, which is presently serving as the "office") I'm finding I need all the encouragement I can get!

egads
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Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:42 am
Location: Long Beach CA

Post by egads »

It's always darkest before the dawn. If you do end up living there, all those grounded plugs and warm insulation will be worth it.

peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Congratulations and good luck with the project!

If it is possible, we would love to see any photos documenting the process...

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Congratulations, outside in.
I wonder if some of what you find as you literally dig into the Ross house will speak or not to the collection of 25+ houses Dr. Storrer's group is researching on William Street.

outside in
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Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

The wooden girder in the basement has deflected about 2 inches, so we jacked it up and installed a new steel column. Note the large clay tiles used for foundation wall construction in the backround.
Image
The drawings show a wooden stop at the window muntins, but glazing putty was used. You can see the difference!
Image
It's actually much easier to install the wooden stops than to use glazing putty. We are being careful to recycle the "wavy" glass as well.
]Image

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

What is the wood specie employed in the sash ?

SDR

outside in
Posts: 1249
Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

its pine, but the rings indicate "old growth" Don't know what species. We're using douglas fir for the stops.

flwright
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 6:32 pm
Location: Saint John, New Brunswick

Post by flwright »

The wood stops make for quite a handsome detail. The change is dramatic!
Morgan

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

One way I know I'm looking at a Wright or Wright-inspired house is if I see those rectangular glass stops, dimensioned to be proud of the surface, on the exterior of sash. I believe Wright found this detail early in his career and maintained it throughout as a characteristic feature of his work, at the intimate end of the architectural scale. It is simultaneously rational, minimal, and rich.

SDR

KevinW
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Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

Post by KevinW »

well said SDR!
KevinW

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Well said indeed. The simple stop makes an elegant shadow line on the sash, and echos the rhythm of mullion to sash.

I get to contemplate the detail more often than I'd expected....all of the "handed" windows (sloped top) and the front door at our house have the stops on the inside face vs. the outside face of the sash. The only explanation I can come up with is that the window fabricator may have had an earlier issue of the prints with the house as a mirror image of its built version.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Interesting. I guess there is really no weathering issue, making one condition superior to the other -- is there ? Would the glass be set with a minimal bedding of glazing compound on both faces (?) of such sash, or would it be set dry ?

Were the stops ever screwed in place, or always nailed ?

SDR

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Deep eaves address weathering. No glazing compound that I can see on the non-stopped face...the sash edge matches the top of the stop on the opposite side of the glass. The stops at our house were nailed with finish nails...I don't know if this was common.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I would expect that as normal. One isn't removing the glass for replacement on a regular schedule (akin to "pulling the wires" in a north European home, as I'm told was once customary every decade or two. . .?).

SDR

IndianaWright
Posts: 38
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 12:06 pm

Post by IndianaWright »

What is the anticipated date of project completion?

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