Most Liveable Wright Home?

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dkottum
Posts: 427
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Battle Lake, MN

Most liveable Wright home

Post by dkottum »

To heck with floor plans and sq footage. Give me a stone house on a spectacular site, with ready access to nature. Preferably away from the city. The Taliesins, Teater, Walker, Kentuck Knob, or Berger would do. Fallingwater. While the argument goes on whether it is a FLLW, I could sit it out at new Chahroudi.



FLLW loved nature, and was at his best on a rugged, natural site. In the city he abstracted the feel of nature in his art glass, features, furniture, and use of light. As Beethoven did with his music. No pictoral representations. At the natural sites, the house and site became a single environment, each giving to the other with the passing of the day, seasons, and weather patterns.



They are all quite liveable, bearing in mind that they were usually very client and site specific.



Doug Kottum, Battle Lake, MN

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

Heurtley House for liveability and relatively low operating/maintenance costs. It is Wright's most efficient large house with architectural significance. The grounds are huge and it sits on one of the most beautiful streets in the US. The garage has a large office component suitable for a small business. It is beautifully restored so that all that one has to do is move in and enjoy. If I had that kind of money I would buy it in a hearbeat.



Second: Cheney House If those walls could talk, that would make this Number One. :)

Third: Davenport House, when restored. Modesty stops me from making this Number One.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

rgrant

Post by rgrant »

An interesting side note on Heurtley: a former owner once tried to build a Bruce Goff house in the back yard, but was prevented by zoning laws. It was one of Goff's more bizarre designs, with a big plastic bubble and ramps all around. It would have been a spectacular house, but in such close quarters to Heurtley, perhaps not in the best of taste.

apboy2

most livable

Post by apboy2 »

Considering not only aesthetics but practicalities like the community and the commute to my job in Detroit, I'd want to go with Palmer in Ann Arbor. It's gorgeous inside and out, it's the right size for us two people, our seven cats and the Chihuahua and if it's falling apart I haven't heard about it.

If aesthetics were the only consideration it would be Armstrong in Ogden Dunes. One job that Jack Howe actually enhanced.















"Well, there you are!"

rgrant

Post by rgrant »

apboy2, the Palmer House is in pristine condition. William Palmer died several years ago, but Mary continued to live in the house, and I have not heard that she has left it yet.

apboy2

most livable

Post by apboy2 »

rgrant, there's no rush, but I'm willing to entertain any offers from Mrs. Palmer in the meantime :?











"Well, there you are!"

Phil Adams

Most Liveable Wright Home

Post by Phil Adams »

I was just reading Wright

Phil Adams

Heurtley

Post by Phil Adams »

Paul, I'm so sorry for miss-spelling your name. For as many of your postings that I have read, I can't believe I did that.

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

No harm. No foul.



My guestimate for property taxes on the Heurtley House is $23,000 to $28,000 /year without the historic preservation property tax freeze. However they were probably frozen in the low $20's. The present owners richly deserve whatever tax breaks are available to them.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

D. Shawn Beckwith

Most livable Wright home

Post by D. Shawn Beckwith »

I am partial to two properties. First the Westcott House. Designed in 1908 but so livable to our today standards. Second is the Willey House.

Reasons for choices, I just project managed the restoration of the Westcott and My Cousin Nancy Willey ( in which she referred to my brother Steve and I as her "Proxy Grandchildren") project managed the Willey House.

Both houses created for Progressive clients, both having interests in Automobiles. Westcott exhibiting the "Japanese influence" and Willey what is functional and practicle for the lady of the house egernomically and functionally.

my 2 cents

KevinW
Posts: 1287
Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

most livable

Post by KevinW »

here's my 2 cents....

1. Not by Wright, but the next best thing, the Paul House 1953 by Aaron Green. Quite simply....Perfect in every single way. Very small, just over 1,000 sf maybe, original owners in their 90's still occupy, have changed nothing since 1953, except a lightbulb or two. Just down the street from the Hanna House.

2. Berger House, just a great place to be.

3. Again, not by Wright, but a former apprentice Bob Beharka's own little home is near perfection. He designed and built himself in the 1960's, still lives there. I visit Bob,...and his lovely home often.

4. Taliesin West, I just love Iovanna's old apartment at the sun cottage, and the Wrights' garden room is in my mind how living rooms are built in heaven!

5. Willits
KevinW

Guest

Post by Guest »

rgrant wrote:apboy2, the Palmer House is in pristine condition. William Palmer died several years ago, but Mary continued to live in the house, and I have not heard that she has left it yet.


I'd be curious to know how many of the residences are still inhabited by the original client/owners.

SWSinDC

Post by SWSinDC »

Anonymous wrote:I'd be curious to know how many of the residences are still inhabited by the original client/owners.


It must be a short list. One, however, is the Schabergs, who are selling their Okemos, MI house on "Wright on the Market."

Guest

Post by Guest »

My Liebermeister AGG, I was able to find four views of the Allan M. Paul House by AGG in the October 1959 House Beautiful. It is amazing what may be done with simple materials on a good site, in the hands of a talented architect who truly understands organic principles. Would you know of a link or publication where we could get a look at the plan and more details for this house?



I have great interest in very small houses of exceptional design and liveability, with hope that the concept is not extinct.



Doug Kottum, Battle Lake, MN

rgrant

Post by rgrant »

SWSinDC, the only houses that I know for certain are client-occupied are Reisley, the house in Tennessee, Christian, Weisblatt, Schaberg (Mr. only; Mrs. died several years ago), Virginia Loveness, the house in St. Louis Park, MN, Fawcett, Buhler, the Erdman prefab in New York and if you count the Franks for whom FLW added onto the Bazett House, Mrs. Franks still live there. Others that have remained in the original families include Mossberg, Llewellyn Wright, Mary Roberts, Kalil, Pearce, Neils, Gilmore and, I believe, Walker. Recently vacated by clients who have either passed away or have moved elsewhere are M. M. Smith, Marden, McCartney, David Wright, Tracy, and Ablin.

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