concrete block

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karnut
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 12:45 pm

concrete block

Post by karnut »

Does anybody make block anything like Mr. Wrights concrete block.

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Re: concrete block

Post by pharding »

karnut wrote:Does anybody make block anything like Mr. Wrights concrete block.


In some houses he used standard sized concrete block, possibly in a custom color. For other projects and applications, he used custom precast concrete shapes. These shapes would now best be created by a cast stone manufacturer or a high quality concrete block manufacturer, such as Northfield Block in suburban Chicago. Cast stone is another term for high quality precast concrete.



Here is one source.



Nichols Bros. Stoneworks, Ltd

20209 Broadway

Snohomish, WA 98296



For the Imperial Hotel, the delicate precast shapes are actually cast terrazzo that looks like what we would call cast stone today. The courser stone is a local Japanese stone. Samples of both of these materials can be viewed at the Art Institute of Chicago where you can see a 3' x 3' x 3' section of the Imperial Hotel.



At the Art Institiute you can also see approximately 10 examples of FLW's finest art glass, including an amazing window from the Darwin Martin House. The Darwin Martin window is the standard window used throughout the house. It's level of detail and intricate pattern are unbelievable. It is clearly an example of what can be created when a great architect has an unlimited budget and the cost of labor is extremely low.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Richard

Post by Richard »

By the way, the Summer 2005 issue of the FLW Quarterly has an article on the "L.A. Textile Block Houses. It has a series of photos showing how textile blocks were handmade utilizing a mold from the Freeman house. As usual, a well documented piece.

Craig Sibley
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2006 12:22 pm

Yes... I make Textile block designs (and so can you!)

Post by Craig Sibley »

I have found that working up a design using MDF (Medium Density Fiber board) as a prototype can be cast with a two part mold making material (available from http://www.smooth-on.com/). The Smooth On company has information on thier site that will help you in the process of making the molds as well as casting the concrete. If someone could tell me how to attach a photograph with this chat... I'd be happy to share some photos of both the prototype for casting and the finished cast piece.
Craig Sibley
California Dude

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