1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

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owenCollins
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by owenCollins »

No, the more fingers, the more glue area---that's right. But if you have a CNC machine, why not let it cut the miters for you. A simply glued miter in 3/4" plywood has more than enough glue area to make a strong joint, without fasteners or biscuits.
The CNC router is dependent on the bit in it. So the angle of the miter may be different than the angles in the available bits. They are usually 60 or 90 degrees.

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

Yes. I guess I was thinking of the full-zoot machine, with the tilting head so any angle is possible, probably using a straight cutter.

Do you expect to find any 90º intersections in your chair ? There isn't a single one visible, for instance, in the section of the Howe chair on the previous page.

Is the arm at 90º to the chair side ? I imagine it could be made so. At least that would be one tight finger joint ?

S

owenCollins
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by owenCollins »

Do you expect to find any 90º intersections in your chair ? There isn't a single one visible, for instance, in the section of the Howe chair on the previous page.

Is the arm at 90º to the chair side ? I imagine it could be made so. At least that would be one tight finger joint ?
THE only 90 degree intersections seems to be at the back 'legs' of the chair. Otherwise they re all are slightly off of 90 (or more). That does present a problem, but once I have time to make it I can see how strong these joints are. Probably after the semester is done I will have time to make one.

Perhaps in the meantime I should try to incorporate that additional seat panel. It does look like it would make the chair more comfortable.

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

If you are doing a Howe rather than a Taliesin or a TAA Origami---the three principal options for which there is original documentation---then why not eliminate the lower seat panel, which is a remnant of Wright's "bird tail" rear leg, and insert just the upper seat panel---which resulted surely from an ergonomic trial for comfort ?

No chair maker should settle on a final design without testing for "how it sits"---unless they are making an art piece rather than a chair !

I wasn't suggesting that an orthogonal finger joint assembled at a slight angle would be a weaker joint---after all, it is the cheeks of the tenons that comprise the accumulated glue surface---but that openings would be left to fill somehow, or to ignore.

S

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

One of the more subtle aspects of chair comfort is how the seat is formed and positioned, and how it reacts as the user sits.

It has struck me that the behind and the mind are grateful for anything the chair can provide by way of accommodation. This accommodation has a temporal aspect: as the behind contacts a seat, it is either welcoming or forbidding. Forbidding seats are flat and hard, and/or positioned at an unkind angle. Yet the slightest adjustment toward accommodation is gratefully if unconsciously received by the sitter.

Proof of this is the difference between a dead-flat seat---a hard and planar chair or bench or pew---and one that has been slightly curved in one way or another. Witness the wooden office or institutional chair which has been given the slightest amount of shaping; even though the material is hardwood, that very modest shaping---you've seen it: a minor carving in the shape of the butt, often with two recesses separated by a slight ridge---is enough to seem a trifle more welcoming. This is likely a psychological phenomenon as much as a physical one.

As to the temporal aspect: cushioning absorbs the weight of the user as she sits. Once she is settled, the cushion remains compressed; it can do little more now except to remain contoured to the user's body, continuing to absorb minor changes in weight and pressure as the sitter shifts her position. It's that initial sensation of being accommodated that enhances the impression of comfort. The ubiquitous gas-lift office chair provides a comparable "welcoming," by moving downward initially as the sitter's weight is absorbed by the air piston. This piston enables the height of the seat to be easily adjusted, but its primary advantage is that it acts as a spring, to provide the important suggestion of comfort. Again, once settled the spring becomes inactive; it is the initial movement that effectively promises comfort.

S

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

What brought that on ? Looking at the Lautner Origami, one can almost feel the slight deflection of that tail, as a sitter drops into the chair. It wouldn't be much; the upholstery would give much more than that slab of 3/4" plywood---but an observer might notice it nevertheless.


Image

Roderick Grant
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by Roderick Grant »

As much as butt accommodation is important for comfort, so too is the shape of the arm rests. Armless chairs are OK for dining, but little else. The downward slope of some of FLW's chairs, including Origami, looks awkward at a glance, but I have found them to be quite comfortable and natural. The strange little uplift on the original barrel chair may seem unimportant, but a chair arm must also take into consideration what the sitter does with his hands.

Then there is the back. In addition to the comfort of the wood seat on the London Bank Chairs (which profit from a small pillow for a long sit) the back rest is very comfortable for a working chair. One tends to sit up at a work station, but on occasion to settle back for a momentary rest, which London does remarkably well.

We all remember the era of the bucket seat in autos, and how they took over in the 60s. Yet they tended to be less comfortable than the old fashioned 'couch' seats that have come back. I had an Alfa Romeo Spider in the 60s. Because of its diminutive size, the seats were relentlessly uncooperative, forcing the driver into a single position. Shift just inches, and you would slide back into position. The '63 Buick Riviera, on the other hand, had plenty of room, and the seats were much more comfortable. (Of course, it got only 8 miles to the gallon, so there was that. "The only thing on the road a Rivera can't pass is a gas station.") Do any of you car experts think the bucket seat will make a comeback?

Roderick Grant
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by Roderick Grant »

There are few FLW designs I dislike, but that floor lamp above is one of them.

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

I don't believe we have looked at the Bank of London chair before. Do we know when this chair was designed or first used ?

https://www.harpgallery.com/shop/item28437.html

Doesn't the Sturges floor lamp look more like Lautner ? Is it seen anywhere besides the Sturges house ?

The design of the automobile "bucket seat" has everything to do with movement and ergonomic dynamics. That is, it was intended to keep the driver positioned when encountering lateral forces while making a turn. The comfy bench seat was conceived in the absence of that consideration.

My lowly Fiat 124 Sport Spyder had continuously-variable seat-back adjustment and adequate lumbar support, helping to make it an excellent touring car.

S

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

George Nakashima Conoid Chair in Rosewood, 1970s:

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d04c9fbd ... 295b5fea58

S

Roderick Grant
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by Roderick Grant »

I have never seen an upholstered Bank of London chair. The version that was popular in offices for decades, back to the late 19th century, was all wood with a slatted back. SDR, you posted a photo of an interior of a house made out of a former power station on Nov 10, 2012: "Wright Mori Chair Spotted." It was a swivel version, but the more common type was standard 4-leg type. I have one swivel and 3 non.

SDR
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Re: 1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

Post by SDR »

Ah. I had never heard a name for that chair; it is one that I had in mind when writing the above.

Funny how the image of that particular "hi-tech" project stays in the mind, isn't it. Unlike J Shulman I am not able to put my hands on those photos, as I have no idea what title I gave the project . . .

Leaving "London" off of the Google query yields better results for the chair we're speaking of:

https://www.kpetersen.com/jurychairs.htm

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bank-of-Englan ... 2576162432

S

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