1949 Taliesin Origami Chair - Dimensions? Sketches? Drawing?

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Matt
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Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:24 am

Post by Matt »

I sat in one of these chairs at T-West and found it comfy, but can't really fall in love with the design. Too heavy and over-complicated.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Yes -- I agree with that, and Wright himself acknowledged that one needed help in moving the chair.

Another interested member wrote, "Maybe this chair is a case of the sum of the parts being greater than the whole...the height of the front of the seat off the
ground, the angle of the seat off the ground, the angle of the back to the seat, the angle your arms rest on the armrests, etc, leave your body in such a pose
that it just feels right." That was after experiencing an Origami at T West, too.

SDR

SREcklund
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Location: Redondo Beach, CA

Post by SREcklund »

Matt wrote:I sat in one of these chairs at T-West and found it comfy, but can't really fall in love with the design. Too heavy and over-complicated.
Interesting ... my response was just the opposite. Comfy as it comes. Admittedly, not an easy chair to move, but if you think of it as a lounge chair, it shouldn't be moving anyway. You _do_ have to get used to getting out of them without tipping forward ...
Docent, Hollyhock House - Hollywood, CA
Humble student of the Master

"Youth is a circumstance you can't do anything about. The trick is to grow up without getting old." - Frank Lloyd Wright

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

I find the origami chairs delightful. But they are rather 'design-intensive,' and as such should be used sparingly. One or two per room would not only be enough, but would mitigate against anything else that might draw attention to itself. The Garden Room at T-West has the origami chairs like thrones before the great fireplace, and a lot of very subordinate pieces that do not compete.

Lillipie81
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Location: New Zealand

Post by Lillipie81 »

I'm so glad I found this forum! Thank you all for your insight it has been very helpful for my study research, especially the drawing plans that have been shared and the link to Cassina's reissued design.

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »


DavidC
Posts: 7699
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Post by DavidC »


SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

"Side chairs" "In the manner of Frank Lloyd Wright" "Arts and Crafts"

Made for a person of girth ?

S

David
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Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2016 4:01 pm
Location: Madrid, Spain
Contact:

Post by David »

Some time ago, I modeled the Taliesin chair following, approximately, the famous Wright drawing that circulates on the internet:

Image

And this is the result:

Image

(You can see a version of this finished model with textures in my images dedicated to the Pauson house)

Recently, I discovered that on Cassina's website it is possible to download a three-dimensional model of the famous chair, so I decided to download it in order to compare it with the one I made:

Image

The "pink" model is that of Cassina, and you can see the two overlapping models here:

Image

What can be concluded from this?

1.- I have lost many hours of modeling making a chair that does not look much like the original chair :evil:

2.- Wright's drawing is undoubtedly a very embryonic state of his design, which evolved into what we can see today.

David
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Contact:

Post by David »

Why did Cassina decide to remove the metal supports from Wright's original design? It is a beautiful detail.

Image

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
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Post by SDR »

Metal supports ? Some models have had foot caps of metal. The separate projecting front leg was no doubt added, by some, to keep the chair from
tipping forward as a sitter put pressure on the arms, when arising ? Given the weight of the chair, I'm surprised that this was found necessary. Lautner
did without it, in his minimal design for Sturges.

Remember that virtually every maker's version is different, in one way or another, from every other. This applies to Cassina as well; just because
they have a contract with the Foundation doesn't mean they didn't make their own changes.

One obvious one, in comparison to your pink model, is the swept-back leading edge to the arm. And, they came up with their own colorways---not
colors that Mr Wright used, for this chair at least, if ever.

I'm glad you produced your exercise. The world can't have too many versions of the Origami Chair !

S

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