Rose and Gertrude Pauson house

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Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I still think ascending the grand stairs calls out for appropriate accompaniment, perhaps the triumphal march from "Aida" or the greatest hits from Palenque.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Maybe a single work of music can be found to accompany a video tour of the property, from entry to departure -- like the Pink Floyd album that supposedly syncs with a portion of "The Wizard of Oz" ?

SDR

Unbrook
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Pauson House

Post by Unbrook »

Were the draperies specified by Wright. Just think-if those draperies were never there, the house might still be standing. I never realized how un-Wright they really are. They stop the space at the window. Without them the eye would continue to the horizon. I was always captivated by the horizontal strip!

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Strip ? The interrupted horizontal muntin (?) in the strip of glass between the french doors has alway intrigued me. I imagine a single length of glass there was just too much to manage, technically ? I like the effect, anyway.

The drapes can't have been intended for sun, as the living room faces north. And there were certainly no nosy neighbors nearby !

SDR

DRN
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Post by DRN »

It has been noted the sisters had tastes that differed...could the drapes have been a compromise to allow the more traditionally leaning Gertrude to feel comfortably sequestered from the blackness of night and the creatures that move in it? On a cloudy or moonless night, the window wall would become a series of black mirrors.
A traditionalist might also just believe a window requires a curtain....Muriel Sweeton was of that mind even though no neighbors had clear views into her house.
Sun control? The late morning sun would have been strong on the house's East facing long axis.
Could the windows and doors have been drafty or cold on windy days? Ours did and do not have weather stripping....some units can have a draft.

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Bringing the Pauson thread to post-outage status.


David

DRN
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Post by DRN »

Keywords: Gertrude, Rose, Pauson, Mosher,

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

Good idea David.
I guess that's a plausible semi-work around. in order to deal with the outage of the search function to go way back, we can bring forward occassional oldies into the present so that they can be found again.

j_f
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Post by j_f »

This is a obligatory first post before being able to quote the following...

j_f
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Pauson Details

Post by j_f »

wjsaia wrote:It�s a welcome pleasure to see the Pauson house thread back at the top of the active list on Wright Chat. Thanks to Jeff and SDR for that . . .

And thanks Jeff for sharing your model with us. It may be the closest many of us will ever get to experiencing this building.

A few things (of many!):

It's interesting to observe that the servant�s quarters being relocated to the utility room side apparently occurred in two stages. This is a drawing Bob Moser developed in August of 1940 during construction for Rose Pauson and FLlW to review. It shows an initial altered arrangement Bob proposed and there are handwritten approvals placed on it by both Rose and FLlW. The bed and wardrobe (�W.R.�) remained at this point in the space directly next to the kitchen. Even though everybody approved this, in the end, I think you could trust that the final arrangement is shown on the plan Bob made for the October 1941 Arizona Highways issue.

Image
Pauson Construction Phase Drawing by Bob Moser, dated Aug. 12, 1940


I do not believe any of the east windows of the Living Room or �Studio� were actually built so as to to open and be equipped with insect screens in spite of multiple indications to the contrary on the working drawings. It was following completion of the house that Bob Moser prepared as-built floor plans for the Arizona Highways issue, and he showed these windows as fixed sash. There was a continual stream of on-the-job negotiations between George Ellis and Bob Moser, and Bob was desperately trying to fulfill the aspiration of getting the project completed on schedule by Mr. Ellis without exceeding the unrealistically low contracted amount. Without some give and take, Ellis might well have walked away, and there would have been resulting litigation instead of a house that the Pauson sisters could occupy in November of 1940.

Although the head and sill sections shown in this drawing appear a bit questionable in certain aspects and likely were modified in the actual construction, it appears there may have been no visual extension of the mullion down past the top of the wall on the interior:

Image
Living Room and Dining Room East Window Details As Shown on Working Drawings

As it was actually constructed, it appears that the north wall of the Living Room would have contained the room�s only active sash, that being the tall glass door in the third bay from the fireplace wall. This departed from the contract drawings that showed three glass doors, all with screen doors. Photos we have of this single door in its open position reveal there was no screen door provided. The plan section shows an offset swaged hinge, which is not a configuration found on piano hinges. The in-swinging entry door was indeed equipped with a screen door. The presence of flies and insects was an issue for the Pauson sisters. Why Bob Moser in 1941 showed two glass doors on the north side, apparently knowing full well that only one was built, might best remain unexplained . . .

I think there was likely no active window sash in the Dining Room, but there are photos that show the three east windows in the Kitchen and Servant�s Bedroom that were constructed to open as awning windows.

Image
Dining Room, Kitchen, and Servant�s Bedroom Window Details

That box at the NE corner of the Living Room was an intake by which return air was drawn back to the forced-air furnace via an underslab duct. There is a heating and ventilation plan, co-signed by George Ellis and Rose Pauson that indicates this function.

WJS


Hello everybody,

As the latest addition to this thread, I feel like I have to extend my gratitude and appreciation to all of you who have contributed here.

And of course David Romero who probably ended all attemps to revive the Pauson House by doing just that in a spectacular fashion - I am joining the ranks and bow down in awe!

Now to the reason that I´m posting on here.
As a part of a reasearch project at my university, regarding the Usonian Houses, I´m looking into the Pauson House. That also includes a digital reconstruction in great detail. The window details that have been posted here (a little while back...) are very helpful and from the looks of it they´re part of a whole catalogue of such.

So I was wondering if first and foremost you WJS - being the one who posted them - but really everyone else who might know this, could help me to find the source of these details.

Of course I got Allan W.G´s book as probably all of you do - and so you know that there are unfortunately not much details.

Thanks a lot this thread has been a great help already
and thanks in advance!

Jay

SDR
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Post by SDR »

The A.D.A EDITA Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph 6 (1986) contains as many drawings as any publication I'm aware of; most if not all of them have been
posted in this thread, at some point. Here's the list of Talisein documents reproduced in the Pauson entry of that book:

Perspective 4011.01
Plans 4011.07
Sections 4011.49
Elevations 4011.55
Sections 4011.54
Elevations of dining space and gallery 4011.53
Details 4011.50


I don't know where WJSaia found the drawings in his post. More of that would be a pleasure . . .

The Taliesin file numbers will demonstrate that any number of useful drawings remain unpublished; only a visit to the archives, now housed at
Columbia University in New York, would uncover all of the extant documents relating to the project. And there one would discover the deluge of
contradictory information contained in the files, as each drawing represents only that day's intention for the house, in its many parts.

Available photographs of the house number less than two dozen in toto, I should think. Yet they contain the only reliable information about what was
actually built -- presumably conforming to the final set of drawings, whichever those might be.

Most if not all of those photos appear in this thread, as well. But you may wish larger image files for your work. I will provide larger files of anything
published here under my name.

Finally, a digital model of the house has already been created; I'm sure that's here, too, in the later pages. All of the research you have ahead of
you has already been done by the maker of that model. Yet in any recreation of a lost historic work there will be multiple unknowns, and thus
choices to be made by the modeler. What can you tell me about the current thinking as to student research and subsequent publication ? What is
the operating ethic, as to use of prior work ? Are the traditional recorded and tacit agreements still in effect, in academia ? I'm merely curious, not
having been a part of academia myself . . .

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Anyway, those drawings that WJS found are really interesting. The lozenge-shaped mullion section, for instance, is a complete surprise to me. Do we
believe that's what got built ? More bizarre milling to be done: acute angles, V-shaped notches -- unnecessary complexity, for the sake of originality ?

I continue to be amazed at what Wright dictated, or encouraged. Why make demanding -- and expensive -- work even more difficult ?

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Yet another reason to keep tabs on the University of Minnesota. John Geiger's archive, willed to UM in 2011, has yet to be posted online.
Shortly before heading to war in the Pacific, John visited the newly built Pauson House, and photographed it. Not sure how extensively, but the photos were in color. I guess all we can do is wait until (or if?) UM makes the archive available.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Can anyone suggest a person, office, or department at the University to be addressed with the question ?

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Yes, SDR has a good question about the mullions and the milling.
Here is what I think about that for what it's worth:

It's all down to Wirght's instinct to mold form and space on the opposite end from flatness and the absolute limits of cube, cone and sphere: in a word "organic".

I imagine the mullions were not built that way, too expensive and difficult.
BUT, if they could have been built that way, if he could have gotten that pushed through the process
... in his thinking (I imagine) it would have been all worth it.

And I agree.

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