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outside in
Posts: 1271
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http://www.treadwaygallery.com/lotInfo.php?i=1831

Post by outside in »

http://www.treadwaygallery.com/lotInfo.php?i=1831

More furniture being sold from houses - does anyone know where this one came from?[/img]

MHOLUBAR
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oberlin, Ohio

Post by MHOLUBAR »

I looked at the Treadway site and the Price Tower piece was labeled as such. Most of the other pieces were from the Heritage Henredon line of FLW Furnishings which may or may not have ever been in a FLW house. On the other hand i believe Treadway is in Cincinatti and the Bosworth house is still for sale isn't it?
mholubar

outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

The piece that is referenced is from the Carlson House in Phoenix - built in 1950 and fabricated using Asbestos panels. Storrer claims it was restored by some former Taliesin apprentice. Is the house still standing?

jlesshafft
Posts: 62
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 2:56 pm

Post by jlesshafft »

Yes, Carslon is still standing. Last time I saw it (Oct 2006) it was painted a hideous blue color)

outside in
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Post by outside in »

that's great, I was afraid of that. I wonder how people would feel if owners started selling off pieces of the floor, interior trim, etc. I'm sure there would be an outcry. But for some reason, furniture is part of the "art" market, and god forbid that anyone would take the auction houses to task! What, Christies or Sothebys involved in unethical behavior? How can that be?

dkottum
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Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

That is the point with Wrightian buildings, as well as many others. The furniture is as equal to the artistic expression and spatial experience as the floor, trim, or cabinets. Its hazard being it is loose. How might these owners understand this seemingly simple principle?

Doug Kottum, Battle Lake

outside in
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Post by outside in »

I think that like most things in America, preservation is best accomplished when there is a financial incentive involved. Owners should become more aware of the easement program, which I believe allows them the option of donating a specific easement on say, a chair, to organizations such as the FLW Building Conservancy and receiving a tax write-off in the process. Secondly, I believe the Conservancy should expand their mission, and work to reclaim these pieces, perhaps by means of a seperate "fund" - wherein the organization could allocate money to try to obtain these pieces and work with the current owners to place the pieces back in the building. Finally, the auction houses would have to stop their predatory view of placing profit above ethics in the partial destruction of a Wright-designed "gesamtkunstwerk" building.

KevinW
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Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

Carlson

Post by KevinW »

The Carlson House is owned by and used as corporate office space for the U-Haul Corporation. 2 years ago I snuck inside and saw all the furnishings stacked and covered with blankets on the side of the house. They claimed to have good intentions but not too sure anymore.
KevinW

Roderick Grant
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Carlson House

Post by Roderick Grant »

The Raymond Carlson House, built for FLW friend and editor of Arizona Highways, is a buff color with turquois trim, which is as it was originally. I think the color scheme works very well. (See "Frank Lloyd Wright Mid-Century Modern, pp 6 - 7. The pink flamingos on the yard go with the place perfectly.) When the former owner, who sold not too long ago, opened the house for the Conservancy in the late 90s, he was dressed in turquois and pink to match his house. Based on a 4' x 4' grid, the winding stair ends up only about 20" wide. Orson Welles would be uncomfortable in the house. Interesting about U-Haul; the U-Haul founding family once owned the Harold Price, Sr. House in Phoenix. There was a murder in the family at the time. Big scandal.

It would be nice to keep everything in its rightful place, but that seems hardly likely ever to happen. If the owner of a FLW house sold bits of it, and the Conservancy bought it, what would they do with it? Put it in storage until the house changed hands and then get the new owner to buy the item? It's not a reasonable course of action. As for the easements, I cannot imagine there is a single homeowner who is not aware of them by now, since the Conservancy has been touting them for many years.

KevinW
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mY ERROR

Post by KevinW »

I got the two homes mixed up, the Price house is indeed still the U-Haul office, sorry for the error. That same trip, though, I did get in the Boomer house. I love that tiny house.
KevinW

pharding
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Location: River Forest, Illinois
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Post by pharding »

outside in wrote:I think that like most things in America, preservation is best accomplished when there is a financial incentive involved. Owners should become more aware of the easement program, which I believe allows them the option of donating a specific easement on say, a chair, to organizations such as the FLW Building Conservancy and receiving a tax write-off in the process. .....
I really wish that the above statement was accurate, however the IRS will take exception with the above. The IRS has two new 2007 publications that address this topic, Publication 526 and Publication 561. Conservation Easements cover Real Property, i.e. real estate. As I understand it furniture is not considered real property unless it is built into the house. If the deduction of furniture is treated as an Object of Art and you continue to use it, the IRS rules do not allow one to claim the deduction until the object is transferred physically to the charitable organization. The FLWBC does not have a museum for these objects. The new IRS rules are more clear. I would consult a knowledgeable accountant for further advice on this. The IRS penalties are extreme.

Legal definition of Real Property. Land and all the things that are attached to it. Anything that is not real property is personal property and personal property is anything that isn't nailed down, dug into or built onto the land. A house is real property, but a dining room set is not.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

outside in
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Post by outside in »

hmm, seems pretty hopeless then, doesn't it? No tax write-offs, and no easements. I would think that the Conservancy SHOULD be involved with issues like this, since there seems to be no other course. It should be mentioned that the Home and Studio once purchased doors for the Charnley House for $300, and held them in storage until SOM purchased the house, and then sold them to SOM for the same price so that they could be reinstalled during the restoration. It seems that if you take the long view, some of these items could be reinstalled in their proper location.

pharding
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Post by pharding »

I could not agree more that the original FLW furniture is an integral part of the design as envisioned by Mr. Wright and that it is critical to the conservation of the house/building.

The US Tax Code has some odd idiosyncratic twists to it. For example one can make charitable donations to a charity in one specific foreign country that has sole control over what constitutes a charity and what is a charity on that list. That foreign country has total control and is not subject to review by the IRS or any federal agency. For charitable contributions to charities in that foreign country one gets a substantial US tax deduction. If that can be written into our tax code, then I see no reason for preservation organizations not to lobby for original furniture designed by an architect of a historic structure to be added to the conservation easement for historic preservation provided that the house is opened periodically for public tours. Certainly conserving important original historic furniture in the US is more important to our society and culture than foreign charities unregulated and undefined by the US government.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

jlesshafft
Posts: 62
Joined: Mon May 07, 2007 2:56 pm

Post by jlesshafft »

Let's be real for a moment....

1. If you were a multi-millionaire with a penchant for everything FLW would you purchase any/all of the items being offered or at least try seriously to buy them? If yes, then isn't railing against the sale a bit hypocritical? If not, then I'd say you're probably deceiving yourself and all of us also.

2. Again, if you were extremely wealthy, would you consider tying up your money to buy these items so that you could possibly sell them to the owner of the original structure somewhere in the future at no profit? Are you really saying you have absolutely nothing better to do with your money, as well as no concept of the time value of money?

3. If you were the owner of a FLW house and hit severe financial straits; say you lost your job, are facing extreme medical bills, etc etc etc. You are sitting (literally and figuratively) on a lot of original FLW furniture. If you could sell a few pieces and get out of your financial difficulties, would you do it? See comments under question 1.

These are hypothetical questions for you to ponder. Noo need to provide answers...

pharding
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Post by pharding »

jlesshafft wrote:Let's be real for a moment....

1. If you were a multi-millionaire with a penchant for everything FLW would you purchase any/all of the items being offered or at least try seriously to buy them? If yes, then isn't railing against the sale a bit hypocritical? If not, then I'd say you're probably deceiving yourself and all of us also.

2. Again, if you were extremely wealthy, would you consider tying up your money to buy these items so that you could possibly sell them to the owner of the original structure somewhere in the future at no profit? Are you really saying you have absolutely nothing better to do with your money, as well as no concept of the time value of money?

3. If you were the owner of a FLW house and hit severe financial straits; say you lost your job, are facing extreme medical bills, etc etc etc. You are sitting (literally and figuratively) on a lot of original FLW furniture. If you could sell a few pieces and get out of your financial difficulties, would you do it? See comments under question 1.

These are hypothetical questions for you to ponder. Noo need to provide answers...
My answers and I sure that others feel the same way:
1. No.
2. No.
3. No.
Most FLW Prairie Houses that could be sold in pieces are worth much more in pieces than whole.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

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