FOR SALE / FLlW Legacy Program House

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SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

"That is not to say that a 'brick for brick' copy, if one could do it, would not give use the same experience as the original. Another performance of a classic by a different orchestra as it were." So said Ed, and I agree. And Paul H is more than right, too.

I for one have never argued for anything other than a letter-perfect (re) creation of a built (or unbuilt, I would plead) Wright project. In the case of an unbuilt work, there would have to be a complete design recorded and ready to detail, at the least. Those would be my #1 and #2-grade "Built to the design of Frank Lloyd Wright" classes. The purpose of these constructions would be to better see, understand and appreciate the hand and heart of Mr Wright, not to line anybody's pocket or "compete" with the existing work. I don't see who other than the Foundation or TAA would be given the authority to decide when and where and to whom permission would be given for such construction. I imagine this to be the correct resurrection of the Legacy Program -- perhaps given a new name, as is the fashion now when reform is undertaken.

SDR

RJH
Posts: 682
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 6:33 pm
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
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Post by RJH »

Current houses by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, James Cutler, Thomas Phifer, Steven Holl, Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen, and others are light years better than any of the Ersatz Wright Houses licensed by Taliesin. There are many others that I could name.
That could be possible.

RJH
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 6:33 pm
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
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Post by RJH »

Frank Lloyd Wright Homes Fulfill Dreams
Owners Impressed By Sense Of Old Design In Modern Times
By

Friday, March 3, 2006

FOR WAYNE MCBROOM, WRIGHT MANIA STARTED IN 1990, the year he became a docent for the Pope-Leighey House, a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home open to the public in Alexandria, Virginia.

In 1992, McBroom decided he wanted a new Wright house built just for him. There was a problem, though: The visionary architect died in 1959. But thanks to Wright's former firm, Taliesin Architects, McBroom's dream has come true.

As the official archive for Wright's drawings and plans, Taliesin offers the Frank Lloyd Wright Legacy program, which enables aficionados to build a previously unbuilt Wright design.

When Wright died, he left behind some 500 unbuilt designs, about 200 of them residential and now potentially fairgame for would-be clients.

Arnold Roy, a Taliesin partner, gets several calls a week about the Legacy program. "Many people expect to get freeplans," he says. "The tenor of the conversation changes considerably when the caller finds out that money will change hands."

And a lot of money will change hands. Start with the purchase of buildable land — preferably at least an acre — then add a non-refundable, $1,500 archival search fee. You'll then travel to Taliesin offices in Arizona or Wisconsin for a presentation of suitable designs. If you proceed, fees will total nearly 30 percent of construction costs, including a royalty to Taliesin.

What's more, the process isn't easy. "We insist upon the home being built according to the original drawings and will veto requests we think violate Mr. Wright's intentions," says Roy, who apprenticed in Wright's studio during the 1950s and has been there ever since.

"I tell people this is going to be an expensive, exacting proposition."

http://www.rockymountainnews.com/news/2 ... ll-dreams/

DRN
Posts: 4044
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Thanks for posting that. I can't wait to look up PA unbuilts in my Monographs..I think the "retreat" they were describing, if I remember correctly, was a precursor to the Seth Peterson design. A shame the paper posted no pics...it would have been nice to see a pic of the built example to be able to compare it to the Monograph's rendering.

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