VIDEO / NEW!! - WRIGHT'S JOHN D. HAYNES HOUSE

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RJH
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VIDEO / NEW!! - WRIGHT'S JOHN D. HAYNES HOUSE

Post by RJH »

Some of the video is old footage pre restoration. Enjoy!

http://youtube.com/watch?v=wUFQiIu_xjM

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The woodwork and brickwork are very handsome. It shows that FLW did not always adhere to his stated template for bricks: deep reveal on the horizontal and brick-colored vertical joints. I cannot imagine the interiors would look better with raked joints.

RJH
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Post by RJH »

Rod, It is hard to tell from the images, but all the horizontal joints are deeply raked and all vertical joints flush and tinted red. Yes, Cypress woodwork some of the best. After 50+ years you can still smell the perfumed scent of Cypress when you first walk in. An old timer Wright apprentice told me it smelled just like when you walked into Taliesin. Also, all slotted stainless steel screws on center holding the batten. You can see a close up in the video and all heads turned horizontal. The house is amazing. I hope to have better images taken and will periodically update YouTube.

JimM
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Post by JimM »

Your ongoing restoration of Haynes is admirable. One thing apparent to me would be to get more books and curios on those shelves. Although a rental, a Wright house still looks better "lived in". You have discreetly furnished it well already, but I suspect you are hesitant to interfere with the architecture! :wink:

I love the icicles, and that particular photo of Frank at the drafting table/customer service counter.... according to Tafel, when he saw this photo Wright added the caption: "I'm an Architect-what'll you have?"

RJH
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Post by RJH »

JimM, Always appreciative of comments. It took us quite a bit of time, effort and especially money to get this far. It will happen though. We would enjoy having you as a guest in order to support the cause.

Some things to look at in the video. The dining table tops were redone with quarter sawn cypress veneer. You can see what a difference it makes versus the rotary cut we first used. Plus it matches the rest of the original house. Yes, The icicles are so cool. I’ve seen some so big and long they just about touch the ground. The view of them through the windows from the inside of the house is even better.

Next would like to take 2 trees down on left and right of front of house and remove ivy that previous owner planted so fits Wright’s landscape design. The partition in the children’s bedroom really needs to be put back up. The entire design of that room is based on this right down to how the small windows open (swing out in opposite directions) above the beds and how desks function. Too bad the previous owner discarded all the original parts. Now, impossible. Take note Paul Harding


http://youtube.com/watch?v=wUFQiIu_xjM

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Nice house. Those cantilevered hip roofs are amazing, and rare for Wright !

I like being able to look at the building with the minimum of distractions, so you have a vote for keeping it as is. (Guess you can't please everybody !)

Thanks for the tour. SDR

ozwrightfan
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Post by ozwrightfan »

I am wondering whether you have installed the folding doors/ screens that you were making, I didn't see them in the you tube posting.

RJH
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Post by RJH »

Thanks SDR. A while ago some here were talking about the use of steel in Wright’s houses. In Haynes, Mr. Wright specified a ton of it be used. Basically, they were to be steel I beams placed horizontally atop brick masses around the house. The specific places were on top of the MBA wall, roof above the daybed/ mitered corner window, several on top of the entryway roof area where they would rest across on the lower mudroom brick walls and also become the mudroom ceiling. Also a very long steel beam resting on top of the brick from the kitchen/fireplace mass to the French doors where the little table with lamp is on. This beam was to be welded to a vertical steel column that was imbedded in the French door mullion support. This was mentioned on chat and the correct terminology for this vertical beam is “Lally Column.� It was T shaped and is a common architectural term and I was surprised none of the trained architects on this site knew it. It is the only 1 vertical steel column in the entire house. Why it is placed there…near the little table area…..and not at the far mitered corner window area near the coffee table is in photos….I have no idea. You would think that corner is where all the down force is from the roof. I guess only Wes would know.

Dad and I also built the two lamps you see based on the Fallingwater lamps. The French doors off the MBR are great for laying in bed and watching it snow outside. So peaceful and total sense of being sheltered. Probably because of the very extended cantilevered roof above. I recall someone saying “Wright’s smaller houses pack more punch then many of his larger high budget designs.� From what I’ve experienced, I think it is definitely true.

One thing that really puzzled me when I first looked at Haynes was the view out the slotted kitchen windows (see video with the snow part). When you look out the tiny window you can actually see the other part of the house (bedroom wing). It was strange but neat affect. For some reason it makes it feel like you are on a ship. I have lived in many different types of houses but anytime I looked out a window….I always saw the neighbor’s house……never my own.

One last neat thing is how Wright designed the rainwater to come off the roof starting at the high flat kitchen ceiling. You will see 2 scuppers in the video punched into the brick where the rainwater comes out. The water then hits the two roof areas below. Part of it goes down the roof over a hard to see flat roof above the middle bathroom and out through another scupper and down to the ground. There are also 2 scuppers above the tool house that expel water as well from the other kitchen ceiling scupper. Total waterfall effect from one level to the next!

We are still finishing up some minor details on the folding accordion doors. Stay tuned.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=wUFQiIu_xjM

SDR
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Post by SDR »

If your column is really T-shaped (which it might be, if included in a window mullion), then it can't be a Lally column, which is a steel pipe about five inches in diameter. We had them in the basement of the house I grew up in. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lally_column As to its placement, it may be that it is actually holding its end of the beam *down* to assure the cantilever at the other end of the beam (over the entry ?). No, looking at the plan, that doesn't make sense.

I would expect to see a beam passing along the top of the partition between the music room and the first bedroom, over the bathroom and cantilevering to support the entry roof. Interesting stuff. You have more information about your house than many. . .

SDR

flwright
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Post by flwright »

Lally column: A prefabricated tubular steel column, usually filled with concrete, used as a structural support for beams and girders; a prominent architectural feature of basement rec rooms.
Morgan

pharding
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Post by pharding »

RJH wrote: ... This was mentioned on chat and the correct terminology for this vertical beam is “Lally Column.� It was T shaped and is a common architectural term and I was surprised none of the trained architects on this site knew it. It is the only 1 vertical steel column in the entire house. Why it is placed there…near the little table area…..and not at the far mitered corner window area near the coffee table is in photos….I have no idea. You would think that corner is where all the down force is from the roof. I guess only Wes would know. ....http://youtube.com/watch?v=wUFQiIu_xjM
Thank you for posting the interesting video. The term "Lally Column' is widely used incorrectly as it is in the above post. It is actually a proprietary product named after the inventor, Lally. It is a prefabricated assembly consisting of a steel column within a steel jacket with the interstitial space filled with a concrete like material. The assembly provides fire protection and ease/economy of erection. FLW did not use these proprietary products because they did not exist then.

The reason that FLW did not put columns at the corners is that the resulting assembly of the column plus attached mullions on two sides would be quite chunky visually. A corner mullion by itself is quite chunky. FLW preferred to use the structural properties of glass to structure the window wall corners and not use mullions at the corners. Thus he created very elegant window wall corners on many projects.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

RJH
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Post by RJH »

I am glad to hear everyone is enjoying the video.

All I can say is there is an arrow in the drawing pointing to the steel vertical T with hand wring stating “Lally Column.� This was the first time I heard this term….so that is what I call them.

I think I wasn’t clear in my “use of steel� in the corners comment. I know Wright would never put steel directly in the corner due to mitered glass. I mean in the mulleins “adjacent� to the mitered corners. I should have been more clear.
Last edited by RJH on Sat Sep 29, 2007 3:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jlesshafft
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Post by jlesshafft »

For anyone who wants to know the true meaning of "lally column" (and Paul Harding is of course correct), see this link:

http://www.lallycolumns.com/

The company is still in business today....

jlesshafft
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Post by jlesshafft »

Only thing I can say is Wright is wrong.

Are you sure it was FLW who wrote that? Maybe an apprentice?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

If a double-tee was drawn, and then Wright in is own hand wrote a correction, that would explain what is on the page ?

SDR

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