eBay / Original Frank Lloyd Wright 1951 Wall Heater

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RJH
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eBay / Original Frank Lloyd Wright 1951 Wall Heater

Post by RJH »


JimM
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Post by JimM »

That's some pretty nice looking brick; how did they find brick specified by Frank to look like cypress? ;)

dtc
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fllw heater

Post by dtc »

This is not a heater designed by F.LL.W. It is a heater that was installed and used for years in the Haynes house, so I would like to know why it is being offered for sale on e-bay? This is part of the original fabric of the house and as such should remain with the house if you choose to use it or not.

dtc

pharding
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Post by pharding »

It is wrong to sell that original component of an historic Frank Lloyd Wright house. It is outrageous to post it here.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

sjnorris
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Post by sjnorris »

I agree it is wrong to sell them. Why not reinstall both heaters ?

outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

Although I agree that removing the original parts of the home should be avoided, it should be pointed out that these electrical heaters are INCREDIBLY dangerous, and have caused numerous fires in homes throughout the country. Furthermore, they use a great deal of energy. In my opinion, its probably going to be safer without them. I'm curious to see if anyone really thinks they have value!

pharding
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Post by pharding »

Patching openings in interior brick walls is extremely difficult if not impossible. The brick never matches. The mortar never matches unless you tuckpoint the whole wall which is too invasive. It is probably best just to disconnect them and put them back in the wall. This is also the most cost effective solution.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

DRN
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Post by DRN »

This thread raises an important issue: the issue of fire safety in a historic building. Maintaining the historic integrity and fabric is important, but isn't recognizing potentially dangerous conditions and working to remedy them important as well?
At Sweeton, I know of a condition in the kitchen which will have to be addressed sooner rather than later. The bottoms of the redwood veneer plywood wall cabinets run at a height of 15" continuously above the base countertop AND the range. The cabinet bottoms do not rise at range, nor are they interupted or shielded with noncombustible material or firesafing insulation. There is no grease hood, just a small exhaust fan near the 12' ceiling which is shared with the bathroom on the other side of the masonry wall. I don't know about the previous owners, but my wife loves to cook, and the thought of a hot wok or a hot anything inches away from 57 year old dried plywood is of concern to me. Hot greasy air must be removed; it has done damage to the cabinets and other finishes over the last 57 years. As an architect and a future steward of the house, I see this as a fire hazard that must be addressed, albeit sensitively.

Mr. Harding, RJH, or any other Wright homeowners, how have you addressed similar issues in your homes?

RJH
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Post by RJH »

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Last edited by RJH on Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.

pharding
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Post by pharding »

DRN wrote:This thread raises an important issue: the issue of fire safety in a historic building. Maintaining the historic integrity and fabric is important, but isn't recognizing potentially dangerous conditions and working to remedy them important as well?
At Sweeton, I know of a condition in the kitchen which will have to be addressed sooner rather than later. The bottoms of the redwood veneer plywood wall cabinets run at a height of 15" continuously above the base counter top AND the range. The cabinet bottoms do not rise at range, nor are they interrupted or shielded with noncombustible material or firesafing insulation. There is no grease hood, just a small exhaust fan near the 12' ceiling which is shared with the bathroom on the other side of the masonry wall. I don't know about the previous owners, but my wife loves to cook, and the thought of a hot wok or a hot anything inches away from 57 year old dried plywood is of concern to me. Hot greasy air must be removed; it has done damage to the cabinets and other finishes over the last 57 years. As an architect and a future steward of the house, I see this as a fire hazard that must be addressed, albeit sensitively.

Mr. Harding, RJH, or any other Wright homeowners, how have you addressed similar issues in your homes?
It depends on the range. A Viking Range burns much hotter than the typical residential range. It is best to review what the manufacturer recommends. However it is a judgment call if the cook top has been in place for 40 or 50 years. It is extremely difficult to alter cabinetry and millwork and have it look appropriate without refinishing the cabinets. In general we follow manufacturers recommendations. In a tight spot we will work with a manufacturer's technical staff and make modest compromises with their input. Nothing is black or white, just shades of grey typically.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

RJH
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Post by RJH »

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Last edited by RJH on Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.

dtc
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Post by dtc »

If I'm not mistaken The owner of the Haynes house is presently building folding wood screens with continuous hinges, because the original ones to the house were either tossed or sold, by a previous owner. (how great it would be if the original screens were in storage)

These heaters should be stored.
If the present owner chooses not to use them so be it, but the future owner of the Haynes house will be glad to know that the original heaters do still survive.

These houses designed by F.LL.W. are bigger and more important than any original client or subsequent owner.
We must not forget that we are only temporary stewards of these houses, with the additional bonus and pleasure of being able to live in them.

dtc

RJH
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Post by RJH »

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Last edited by RJH on Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jlesshafft
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Post by jlesshafft »

Apparently everyone else strongly feels you are doing the WRONG thing. Maybe you should reconsider....

Of course, I seriously doubt if they are going to sell anyway.

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