Old School Architecture Tools

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Deke
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Old School Architecture Tools

Post by Deke »

I'm reading the "Fellowship" book and it caused me to consider how architectural work was done in the mid-century. What materials were used in the pre-computer era? They didn't have foam-core did they? Or pre-cut bass wood for model making? What about mechanical pencils and pens? I assume they just had pencils, t-square and triangle, and lots of...papyrus to draw on, right? In their caves? By the light of the fire?



DK

MHOLUBAR
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Post by MHOLUBAR »

I used to play under my father's drafting table, which he had rigged with flourescent lights and a glass top to facilitate tracing. He had triangles, T-squares and assorted other templates. We had balsa wood and basswood left over from any models, that were required. He had tracing vellum and cheaper material and occasionally he would have to ink a drawing so i would have to leave the room.
mholubar

dkottum
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Location: Battle Lake, MN

Old School Architecture Tools

Post by dkottum »

Old school nothing! I have met several architects who prefer and continue to use pencil and paper. In my own very limited residential design work, I like the pencil on paper. Plan it out in your head first. You have to think, but it still works, and some say it is more creative. And yes, I have plenty of time.



Doug Kottom, Battle Lake, MN

Richard
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Post by Richard »

We used ruling pens in design school. Did they use them much in architecture?
Homeowner

mike
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cad vs. drawing

Post by mike »

While I use CAD now I still have all the old school "tools" in my office. I prefer hand drawings. Not much soul or art to CAD!!!
St Louis

JimM
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Post by JimM »

Am I that old to remember when drafting and design required talent, not not clicking on a tool pallete?



I first used CAD in an engineering office where the plotter needed its own room and the equipment was the size of a refridgerator!



Although I use CAD (I can easily tell a quality manual drafters work on CAD from someone who can do neither well)- I had occasion recently to do a small job by hand. It was wonderful, and I had forgotten what a pleasure it was to sense and define line weight, letter and layout with the "tools of the trade". Even with the many benefits of CAD, the "art" of design has changed forever and most buildings today are evidence of this.



Too bad the income potential hasn't changed as dramatically as the process!

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Then, you have the amateurs who have discovered a "drawing program" -- and become instant architects !



http://www.designcommunity.com/forums/v ... highlight=



:roll: SDR

Ed Jarolin
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Post by Ed Jarolin »

Re: Instant architects.



"Stupid is, as stupid does." Guess this is for the "artistically" minded for whom picking out the paint and carpet in their McMansions is insufficient expression of their talents.



In a similiar vein. What about those subsequent owners of Wright houses who felt the need to add their own "artistry" into the mix? One example of this occurred at the Richard Smith house in Jefferson, Wisconsin. The mostly glass entrance doors were removed and solid doors with cutouts for glass lites were installed. The additional artistic touch consisted of the glass colors for the 4 lites; red, green, blue and yellow. I observed this back in the '70's and I trust it has been made Wright again by now.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

So we could hope. I hadn't heard about that example.



If privacy had been the issue, wouldn't the substitution of frosted glass have been preferable ? (Come to think of it, I can't recall Wright having used translucent glazing material. . .)



SDR

Ed Jarolin
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Post by Ed Jarolin »

SDR,



On the subject of the Smith house, Storrer mentions that restoration work was done in the 1990's by John Eifler. Presumably the door issue was taken care of then. However, the appearance at an auction house of a piece of furniture from this house makes me wonder what's going on there now.



As far as frosted/translucent glass in Wright's work, the only instances I can think of are in skylight applications such as Beth Sholom Synagogue, the Guggenheim, etc. When privacy was an issue the leaded glass of the Prairie era and fretwork cutouts in the Usonian era seem to be his answer.

Raymond Vincent Edwards
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Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 5:33 pm

CAD is for the ameteur

Post by Raymond Vincent Edwards »

Ever since I have viewed any CAD program results , I have refused to even consider buying such a program for my PC; I simply refer to it as "MULTIPLE CHOICE ARCHITECTURE ". Scanning real drawings , and making adjusments , that is an art form.

RJH
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Post by RJH »

I didn

Raymond Vincent Edwards
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Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 5:33 pm

Pope -Leighey Glass Doors

Post by Raymond Vincent Edwards »

The Pope's only lived in the house for about two years ; but Marjorie Leighey , did have floor to cieling curtains installed , 3/4" rods innocuously screwed to the wood ceilings ; hand drawn , not traverse, so that when pulled back when she was at home , they were unnoticeable. When privicy was wanted , or she was not home she would just grab the curtain edges and instant privicy!

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