Buildings and homes built AFTER Wright died

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Do you think Wright designs built after his Death can be called "Official Wright Designs"?

Poll ended at Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:11 pm

Yes
2
13%
No
7
44%
Depends on who supervises
7
44%
 
Total votes: 16

Michael Shuck
Posts: 197
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:31 pm
Location: Wichita, KS

Nakoma

Post by Michael Shuck »

There is an old correction to the site here that hasn't resurfaced in regards to the Nakoma building at Gold Mountain. It was NOT kept to the original plans, but modified for the purpose there. The changes were overseen by Taliesin, but, nonetheless, it is NOT to the original plans.

DRN
Posts: 3976
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Hypnoraygun-

The article you posted from "enquirer.com" dated August 16, 2003 is the Usonian house in Ohio, I noted in my list. Thanks for finding it. I couldn't remember where I saw it.

If you compare the house in the pictures to the houses illustrated in the Goetsch-Winckler book, "Affordable Dreams" or the Monograph you can see which house was used as the donor model. It is obvious the Legacy version didn't use period board and batten siding, used a gabled roof, and the interior seems to have been sheathed with plaster or drywall.



I'd catagorize it as "inspired by" if I had to catagorize it at all; too much has been changed or "builder-ized" to call it "a Wright design". Still, it is a great house.

RJH
Posts: 682
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 6:33 pm
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Contact:

Post by RJH »

In Rattenbury

RJH
Posts: 682
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 6:33 pm
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Contact:

Post by RJH »


JimM
Posts: 1551
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Post by JimM »

That variant of the Scully house in VA is really nice; although stone instead of plaster (?) on the exterior pier elements would be killer- but that great cantilever really defines the design.



Thanks, RJH.

pepsigns
Posts: 26
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 2:23 pm

ALLWRIGHTY THEN!

Post by pepsigns »

Let's be snobby purist and vote no. Lets get the foundation to adopt the position and then let's open subdivisions in every major and knock them off till they are a common as dirt. After all there not Wright....Hmmm...Do I want a Robie or a Allen Model? Guys you can't have it both ways!

jrdet10
Posts: 32
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:32 pm
Location: Detroit MI USA

Post by jrdet10 »

Call me naive, but from what I remember reading in my early days of being an FLLW Fanboy, his designs were meant to be integrated with the site. So unless the design is built on the site he specified, or something pretty close to it, it ain't Wright. One exception would be Monona Terrace, a prime example of Wright Lite.
"Well, there you are!"

outside in
Posts: 1261
Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 9:02 pm
Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

round and round we go - ultimately the legacy program is based on built projects, and with each year we see fewer and fewer. The expense and fees continue to make even the possibility of building these projects remote. And the projects that come to fruition, fall short. So much attention given to such a small segment of the built environment! In the long run, people will get tired of living in the past and seek out architects that deal with contemporary issues, not Wright's oil-dependent suburban vision of the future.

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