Glore House on market

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jim
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Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 6:53 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by jim »

I was fortunate enough to visit the Glore house around 1965, just as new owners from Calfornia had moved in. The sand float ceilings were then still unpainted. However, looking in various FLlW books on my shelf, I have seen several houses where a leaking roof left serious spots, a factor I would imagine has led many owners to paint the ceilings. (the roof was wood shakes).



The glass was clear in the blocks.



An aluminum framed greenhouse was in the process of installation on the upstairs balcony, designed by Taliesin Associated Architects, for the new owners cactus collection. (since removed).



The owners were preparing to start construction on a major addition of a family room and larger kitchen, an "L" off the existing kitchen, also designed by Taliesin. This of course was never constructed.



There was NO Wright designed movable furniture in the house.
Jim

Richard
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Illinois

Post by Richard »

Very interesting information Jim.



The owners who sold me the house had told me that there wasn't any furniture designed for the house except for the dining table which was drawn on the blueprints but never built. By the way, in the Adita Monograph, the first floor plan shows a dining table adjacent to the fireplace off the wall. That plan has the fireplace wall at 90 degrees to the kitchen. It was built at 120 degrees as in the final plans. Either way, way too tight especially with the module reduction. I may contact the archives to see if in fact no furniture was designed.



The previous owners did build a master bedroom set out of mahogany which looks the part. They also built a wonderful lighted stand which can be seen in the photos under the floating staircase and a chair which was designed for the kitchen penisula. The peninsula was removed when we restored the kitchen back to the original layout. All very well made furinture.



When Wright designed furniture, did he typically note them on the prints as he did the dining table?



The green house on the balcony off the master you mention is in the Adita book. No way to put it nicely... What were they thinking? In this same photograph, there are 4 life size, apparently authentic, ship's cannons on the patio below. Very amusing. The partying at the neighbor's house to the south must have gotten a bit rough.



When Wright designed furniture, did he typically note them on the prints as he did the dining table?



The wood shakes were replaced by the previous owner with a horizontal copper shingled roof as was specified on the drawings. The patina is just starting to develop a richer green.



Finally, in another Adita photo, there is a late 50's early 60's vintage white Mercedes convertable in the car port.



Richard
Homeowner

RJH
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Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
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Post by RJH »

Richard,



I will be kind enough to share my research with you in regard to your questions in the hope it might point you in the right direction in further preserving the house.



Most every 1950

FTA
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2005 7:56 pm

Post by FTA »

Thanks for alerting Wright Chat to the sale of the Glore house. I've enjoyed visiting the realtor's site, doing the 360, even wading through the "banter" between Richard and RJH, etc.



A couple of comments ... While a house the size of Wingspread certainly has its unmistakeable "core" (and of huge proportion at that), it is also very much a zoned house. So much so, as I am looking at a floor plan of it, the zones are labeled:

Zone I (unlabeled - "core" and master bedroom/s)

Zone II children (3 bedrooms AND a "family room" about as far from the master bedrooms as possible!

Zone III Guests and Carport

Zone IV Service



The Price house in Bartlesville had a separate family room off the kitchen so Mrs Price could keep an eye on the children from the kitchen. Later, Wesley Peters designed a fantastic room, the "Carousel," that seamlessly attaches to the original house and was added on when the original family room got smaller as the children got bigger.



Mr Wright refers to additions to his own designs (presumably ones he would make) as compared to a polywog ... continuing the design intent in relation to the unit system, which cohesively ties everything together.



The Laurent's expanded their house to enlarge the dining space. Though not a "family room" per se, it did enhance the houses usability for them.



Regrettably, there have been some real "botches" in the name of addition, renovation, or even preservation. However, I would say "well done" with what I see from photos of the Glore house.



I don't know that Wright intended his houses to be "static." His personal houses never were!! But at the same time, he's not here to give his nod or signature to changes today. Perhaps one reason there are so many houses on "Wright on the Market" (and elsewhere, such as Glore) is that not just anyone these days is prepared to conform their lifestyle to the design of a house. (We've done that to a degree with our "Usonian wannabe" and, 12 years later, continue to be content with its modest proportions and practicality.)



I can think of several other Wright houses I've been in that have been "zoned" with more than one living area - that were very much Usonian and had not been altered or added to.



Even in our modest architecturally designed (in 1957) "Usonian wannabe" we have sought to respect the original intent in what few modifications we have made. After 50 years of life, the kitchen is presenlty going through a makeover. Some were suprised we didn't want to put in "modern" cabinetry, for example. Rather, our slight alteration retains the original vernacular and we are delighted with the result and who cares what others think? They don't have to live with it!



Of course, we are all disadvantaged by not getting to be IN the Glore house to examine it personally and relish its ambience. I was in conversation today with a fellow Wright enthusiast who was visiting us in our home for the first time. The "feel" of a Wright house is hard to describe to the uninitiated. I believe that "feel" is owing, in part, to the unit system and the inherent rhythms created that other architecture simply cannot capture or replicate. I have yet to discover that "feel" in any other architecture quite like it is experienced in Wright.



So there are a few ramblings and thoughts. I want to commend you for the care that has been taken of the Glore house, the fact that it was rescued, and that the rooms are of a size and function that a present day dweller will find acceptable. I wish you success and may a new owner be equally respectful.



To RJH - how regrettable that original components were lost. I've heard that tale from several second owners who could have restored order more authentically and economically had those pieces been retained.



FTA
Former Taliesin Apprentice

Richard
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Illinois

Post by Richard »

RJH,



Took another look at the drawings this morning. Builtins are there as is the dining table. Nothing else. And I have the entire set of drawings. Your theory about Glore is what I have always speculated. He either had his own collection or just wasn't interested in Wright's furniture.



The low winter sun is perfect. I had concerns about potenital glare and read that LCDs are not effected as are plasmas. I purchased an LCD and was amazed that on a sunny day there is zero glare. The only glare is on the trim which surrounds the screen but it is not distracting. The room is a pleasure to sit in on sunny days.



On a sunny day with temperatures in the teens, the heat on the first floor shuts off as it does on the South zone of the second floor. There was no solar gain in the library or foyer before the addition due to the deep overhang. The new solar gain is now a huge plus. We installed a ductless split HVAC system in the cabinet behind the TV to provide AC.



There is no overhang off the dining room and there is no overhang off the addition. The construction details between old and new are identical. The dining room is fine in the summer with the spacepack HVAC which was installed by the previous owners. The addition will be fine as well due to enough tonnage in the ductless spilt system. We are a block from the lake here which makes a huge difference in the number of days needed for AC. We may have had 10 AC days last summer. Plus there are enormous oaks and elms everywhere providing shade.



I will check further about the furniture.



Richard
Homeowner

RJH
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Post by RJH »

Richard,



I am proud of you that you are further investigating the Glore furniture.



I would still suggest contacting the FLW Foundation and ask them if there is anything in the Glore archive for furniture for the house. Exhaust every avenue. There is nothing to lose. A grand house as Glore must have a lot of information in the file.



I would also suggest contacting in writing:



Ted Walbye, Senior Collections Assistant

Special Collections & Visual Resources Research Library

The J. Paul Getty Museum

1200 Getty Center Dr., Suite 1100

Los Angeles, CA 90049-1688

twalbye@getty.edu



http://www.getty.edu/research/conductin ... right.html





Make sure to specifically say that you are the Glore

Richard
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Illinois

Post by Richard »

RJH,



Thanks for the info.



Richard
Homeowner

Richard
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Illinois

Post by Richard »

The following was posted under the Davenport subject by mistake. But it was a response to the post under the Davenport subject by RJH.



For the record.



One glass wall was moved at Glore by 13 feet within the footprint of the building to create a "family room". Severe? Patios and decks which were not original were modified. The shape of the deck was changed to represent the pools which were never built. The extended patio and the low brick walls were not built until the 80's.



If one insists on calling this a Usonian, then we go to Sergeant's book again whereby he explains that Wright referred to his houses as "kits of parts... How ...without deformity they could be expanded later for the needs of a growing Family" Note, he did not say "bedrooms only" he said "needs". (Wright, The Natural House, p. 167.). The inventiveness

of the construction design of the board and batten walls made their movement possible. One could say that the houses were designed to be altered as needed. Well conceived design/planning and precedent by Wright himself.



Furtheremore, the Hanna house for example according to Sergeant was "...designed to allow the interior to be radically replanned". Also houses such as the Sondern house as well as the Rosenbaum house were extended and added on to.



It is the sensitivity of the restoration or additon which is paramount and thereby the homage.



Richard

_________________

Homeowner
Homeowner

RJH
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Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
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Post by RJH »

Richard,



The Glore project number is #5107. Haynes is #5110. We are very close to one another and Mr. Wright probably had both our houses on his drawing board at the same time. I counted over 50 pieces of correspondence related to the Glore project ranging from May 1951 to August 1957. This is a good amount of correspondence and I

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