Shavin house pics

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SDR
Posts: 18806
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Shavin house pics

Post by SDR »

A blogger http://archidose.blogspot.com/ [see "The Year in Photos] was kind enough to post one of these shots; here is the complete album. . .



http://www.flickr.com/photos/wizum/sets ... 318800125/



Some exceptional stonework, here, and those wonderful canted roof fascias. . .



SDR

Richard
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Illinois

Post by Richard »

Oh, this is great. I had taken a look at the topic and thought it was spam!

"Shavin" house pictures... Then I thought twice. I've got to get my head out of the gutter as I almost missed these photos.



Great house!
Homeowner

SDR
Posts: 18806
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

It's kind of delicious -- a long straight drive up to the house, without a clue to the "payoff": a magnificent outlook beyond (northward) at the top of the site. And the original shot that shows the drive back to the street from the house.



I'm not crazy about Wright's "flip-top" houses -- the ones from the last decade, with what seems to me to be too steep a pitch, to only one part of the roof. But I'm a purist, I suppose -- and I haven't actually visited any of these.



SDR

Deke
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Location: Los Angeles
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Post by Deke »

Terrific to see another design in the flesh as it were. Love the stone work, though the kitchen cabinets...as my girlfriend would say, "Ugh!".



I'm always fascinated at how FLW houses show their age, with the wood elements starting to weather or buckle, while the stonework remains fresh and sharp.



Deke

JimM
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Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Post by JimM »

SDR wrote:I'm not crazy about Wright's "flip-top" houses -- the ones from the last decade, with what seems to me to be too steep a pitch, to only one part of the roof. But I'm a purist, I suppose -- and I haven't actually visited any of these.SDR


I had the same opinion. Most published photos of them, including Shavin, are unflattering. I'm not surprised to see they are actually beautiful designs, with Peterson representing the essence of this genre.



Whether the high slopes are due to structural considerations, I don't know. The steep pitch certainly imparts drama to the window walls, not to mention that shed roofs are economical..... well, maybe not in a Wright house, but that may also have been a factor in their design.

SDR
Posts: 18806
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I don't know. . . Drama, certainly. Maybe he wanted to clearly distinguish between the flat roofs and the pitched one. I'm just cynical enough to suggest that he wanted to distinguish between his houses and other contemporary designs; most of them with pitched roofs had low slopes. Think of the Eichlers, as an example.



Of course, these houses probably look smaller "in the flesh" than in photos; perhaps the living rooms are less grandiose than I think they are.



SDR

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