Wright is the architect's hero. . .because ?

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SDR
Posts: 18785
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Wright is the architect's hero. . .because ?

Post by SDR »

In this year, centennial of the Pettit Mortuary Chapel, River Forest Country Club, Robie house, and the Beachy, Nichols, Hoyt, DeRhodes, Grace Fuller, Gridley and Millard [Highland Park] houses (using Storrer's current listing, I think), we might pause (as Wright seems to have done in this mid-Prairie moment?) to ask: why is this man the hero of so many us who design, and so many others ?



I say, that it's because of his seemingly uncompromising drive to place architectural beauty and meaning -- in an unorthodox and at times exotic, both forward- and backward-looking way -- before all other considerations, and to get such buildings built, by the score.



These worderful ideas, this exalted vision -- he actually got it built, in sufficient variety to inform us of what he was after, and without being just a "one-trick pony" -- far from it. [I say "seemingly uncompromising," because he wistfully envisioned (according to the autobiography) the unbuildable ideal of some of these early forms, without windows. . . channeling perhaps the whole gamut of architectural iconography, from the pyramids on, not forgetting Richardson's stone-cairn monument and Sullivan's Wainwright tomb ?]



Like Bach, working with the materials of his contemporaries, Wright sails far above them on his own plane of inspiration and resolve; the imagined becomes real, and we share in the deposited result -- even now, a century (or three) later.



Happy new year, on that note. . .SDR

JimM
Posts: 1509
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Re: Wright is the architect's hero. . .because ?

Post by JimM »

SDR wrote:I say, that it's because of his seemingly uncompromising drive to place architectural beauty and meaning -- in an unorthodox and at times exotic, both forward- and backward-looking way -- before all other considerations, and to get such buildings built, by the score.



These worderful ideas, this exalted vision -- he actually got it built, in sufficient variety to inform us of what he was after, and without being just a "one-trick pony" -- far from it. [I say "seemingly uncompromising," because he wistfully envisioned (according to the autobiography) the unbuildable ideal of some of these early forms, without windows. . . channeling perhaps the whole gamut of architectural iconography, from the pyramids on, not forgetting Richardson's stone-cairn monument and Sullivan's Wainwright tomb ?]



Like Bach, working with the materials of his contemporaries, Wright sails far above them on his own plane of inspiration and resolve; the imagined becomes real, and we share in the deposited result -- even now, a century (or three) later.


Well put.... especially the importance of his ability to continually express ideas; each jewel shines with its own unique brilliance. The fact he was able to construct so many unorthodox buildings, often in spite of himself and the turmoil he relished, is nothing shortt of miraculous. In addition, it's easy to forget in todays world of available technology and precedence how incredibly difficult it really was to do so. The self realization of his own genius undoubtedly helped.



Beyond the art, he also lived long enough to become one of the first stars in the pubescent modern media age-a perfect fit.



Frank just had the whole package.

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