Recommended Power Tools for FLW Projects

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pharding
Posts: 2252
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
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Recommended Power Tools for FLW Projects

Post by pharding »

High quality tools are conducive to getting a high quality job. Obviously the most important component is the skill of the carpenter. The best tools are more precise, more efficient, and more ergonometric. Over the last two years we have had an opportunity to use the tools our carpenters and skilled subcontractors have been using and to seek out high quality tools for specialized restoration tasks. There is currently broad disparity in the quality of tools due to so many tools, like everything else, being manufactured in China and so much focus only on initial cost in the market place. Based upon our research and hands on experience the following are highly recommended.



Load Cells We had great success with Futek, although we did not have experience with others. These were invaluable when jacking the severely deflected floor framing with optimistic FLW wall truss above, which had defected an 1 3/4" above the living room.



Construction Cutter Fein Dustless Construction Cutter. Model: MF 12-180. This is an expensive, precise, robust tool for cutting into an assembly to a precise depth. This allows one to do selective demolition to precise depths in an efficient manner. Great tool for restoration.



Demolition Saw Milwaukee Super Sawz All. Crude, and not precise, but powerful for challenging demolition tasks. Dangerous for restoration selective demolition in the wrong hands.



Detail Sander and Cutter Fein MultiMaster System. The head of this tool oscillates at an amazing 12,000-21,000 cycles per minute. When one needs to do detail sanding or cutting this is an awesome tool.



Dust Extractor/Vacuum Fein 9-77-25 Turbo III. This can filter small particles as small as 1 micron. This great for your lungs and maintaining a low dust construction site which is always a challenge. The Festool CT 22 Hepa is also a wonderful unit. It integrates well with their tool system.



Planer DeWalt Heavy-Duty 13" Three Knife, Two Speed Thickness Planer - DW735.



Table Saw Bosch 10″ Worksite Table Saw with Gravity-Rise Wheeled Stand Model 4000-09. Well made and reasonably precise. My only criticism of this is that it is a bit bulky and heavy. In the Spring, this unorthodox, extremely precise and clever German table saw will be available. This will probably be my first choice table saw for precision and job-site portability. Festool Trimming saw CS 70 EB-Set. You can see it here at this Australian web site.

http://www.festool.com.au/mediandoweb/i ... N=1&#anker



Circular Plunge Saw Festool Circular Saw TS 55 EQ with guide rails. Another unorthodox, precise, efficient, user friendly power tool. The build quality and engineering of this product, like the other Festool power tools is rather amazing. Part of a great system. You may see it here by clicking on the animation on this web page.

http://www.festoolusa.com/ProductDetail ... d= 561174



Circular Saw Type 2 Bosch 7-1/4" Worm Drive Construction Saw.



Belt Sander Bosch.



Planer Festool Planer HL 850 E Unique planer with the capability to plane into corners with zero tolerance. Very quiet, very precise, very fast.



Sander Festool 6" dual mode sander RO 150 FEQ. Rough sander, fine sander and polisher in one. Great tool with dust extraction like other Festools. Results are amazing.



Cordless Screwdriver / Drill Festool Cordless drill C12 1.3 Ah Set.



Router Festool Router OF 1400 EQ.



Jigsaw Festool Jigsaw TRION PS 300 EQ. Substantially better than any other jig saw that I have experienced or demoed. The splinter guard works extremely well for finishes. This tool drops into the modular Festool guide rail system for precise cuts. The blades are thicker so that the blades do not twist like the typical jig saw.



Band saw Rikon Model 10-325. I do not have this tool. Unfortunately I bought a smaller table top band saw that was a mistake.



Jointer Rikon 6" JOINTER Model 20-110 I may purchase this for use building 80 interior screens and insulated glass storm windows. This may also be pressed into service to build FLW furniture for the house. Part of the challenge for me is where to put the larger tools and to hide them from my wife.



Flush Cut Saw Bosch Finecut Power Handsaw Model 1640VS.



Nail Gun for Light Gauge Structural Steel Straps Another unique amazing tool. Hitachi NR65AK(S) Strap-Tite Fastening System with Short Magazine.



Finish Nailer Type 1 Hitachi NT65A3 2 1/2" Finish Nailer with 16-Gauge Finish Nails.



Finish Nailer Type 2 Hitachi NT50AE2 2" 18-Gauge Brad Nailer.



Rough Framing Nailer Paslode Cordless Framing Nailer.



Cap Stapler Bostitch SB150SLBC-1. Useful for Tyvek and Temporary roofing.
Last edited by pharding on Mon Jan 01, 2007 12:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

SDR
Posts: 18785
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Thanks for the many recommendations. The Festool line has escaped most of us so far, I imagine, though I saw the saw-and-guide setup on "This Old House" a year or two ago. Glad to know of the several additions. We all use the Bosch jig-saw (only wish it had a motor brake !) and the very expensive blades cut well but wandering below the cut-line is a problem. . .



You don't identify the Bosch belt sander; is it the 3 x 21 ? This smaller size "block" has been a favorite, as it can be used one-handed for certain applications.



Experience is the only way to assess a tool, so it is useful to have advice from those who have had it.



SDR

pharding
Posts: 2252
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

SDR wrote:You don't identify the Bosch belt sander; is it the 3 x 21 ? This smaller size "block" has been a favorite, as it can be used one-handed for certain applications.
Yes we use the Bosch 3" x 21" Variable Speed Belt Sander. The larger Bosch belt sanders are too big and heavy for our purposes.
Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

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