Lake Geneva Hotel

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SDR
Posts: 20187
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Lake Geneva Hotel

Post by SDR »

"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

SDR
Posts: 20187
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Lake Geneva Hotel

Post by SDR »

The Como Orchard drawings are exceptional; Wright at his most rustic. Two lovely inked perspective views of a cottage, one with floral decoration, are worth study; one could imagine tinting copies of them, as an exercise. I have never seen a measured isometric construction detail like the one on a cottage sheet . . .

S
"As a former copy editor, I always feel I am defending the person whose name is being misspelled, not attacking the person who misspells it." Ronald Alan McCrea (1943-2019)

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10569
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Lake Geneva Hotel

Post by Roderick Grant »

Had any of the three - Horseshoe, Como, Bitterroot - survived much longer than they did, there would have to have been major alterations to them: The bathrooms in all 3 were communal.

Pipestone had such a hotel, the highly regarded Royal Palm (in Minnesota, imagine!) Hotel, a 2-story, sprawling, stone building with sumptuous suites, but with the 'can' down the hall. In the 1880s it was considered tres chic! It survived into the 60s only because the grand entrance Trinity Room - lobby, flanked by restaurant and pool hall, measuring 100' end to end - stayed in business, while all the upstairs suites gathered dust.

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