Article: Woodworking shop by FLW apprentice Chester Wisniewski

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DavidC
Posts: 8121
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Article: Woodworking shop by FLW apprentice Chester Wisniewski

Post by DavidC »

Chester Wisniewski arrived at Taliesin on Jan. 1st, 1948.

I'm not a member of Dwell, but perhaps someone here who is could post the article:

Before & After: A Trio of Brothers Turn Their Father’s Boatbuilding Workshop Into a Family Retreat


David

DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Re: Article: Woodworking shop by FLW apprentice Chester Wisniewski

Post by DavidC »

The Shop


David

Matt2
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Re: Article: Woodworking shop by FLW apprentice Chester Wisniewski

Post by Matt2 »

What's the benefit of crossed rafters like that? Or is it just a Japanese aesthetic choice.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Article: Woodworking shop by FLW apprentice Chester Wisniewski

Post by SDR »

Ceremonial. Ise shrine, the most holy center of the Shinto religion, has been reconstructed every twenty years since c. 680 CE. The Shoden, or main structure, is accompanied by two treasure houses. Three miles from the illustrated compound is another shrine, erected 200 years earlier for the grain goddess Toyouke-no-Okami. Perhaps the structures of Ise Naiku (the "inner shrine" seen here) were inspired by raised granary structures ?

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The compound from the air, showing the twin building sites, each surrounded by three concentric fences.

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