The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Rood
Posts: 1189
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by Rood »

Yes, the Illinois was "for Chicago", but to be fair to Mr. Wright, he intended his Mile High to be set in a one-mile-square park.

SDR
Posts: 20206
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by SDR »

So that, if it fell over, it wouldn't damage neighboring properties ?

Oops---I guess it would have to be a two-mile-square park . . .!

S

Rood
Posts: 1189
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by Rood »

Rood wrote:
Fri Sep 18, 2020 10:40 pm
Yes, the Illinois was "for Chicago", but to be fair to Mr. Wright, he intended his Mile High to be set in a one-mile-square park, his reasoning being squarely in line with decentralization. Rather than cluttering the landscape with buildings and streets covering every scrap of land ... it would be possible to build several Mile-Highs and tear down the clutter. As I recall, Mr. Wright said something to the effect, and I paraphrase ... if you want to centralize ... this is the way to do it.

SDR
Posts: 20206
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by SDR »

Uh-huh. So, doing Corbu one better ?

https://99percentinvisible.org/article/ ... iant-city/

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10575
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by Roderick Grant »

@ 0:33 the building is shown from above in an urban grid as if it could fit comfortably amid the existing city. One mile square or two miles square, the infrastructure to support getting people into and out of the Illinois would have necessitated demolishing the entire Loop. Parks in spaces between freeways and cloverleaves would be unavoidable; there would be nothing else to be done with the leftover land. Well, maybe an occasional taco truck....

Imagine if it had been built anywhere in the 1950s (it would have required about 15 - 20 years to complete). It would have been the target of choice for Osama and his gang.

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10575
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by Roderick Grant »

Ville Radieuse was a truthful statement about Utopian ambitions: It is a glaring clarification that Utopia is exactly the opposite of what it was meant to be. People are neither ants, bees nor termites. People don't conform to the insane demands of Fascists and Corbu.

SDR
Posts: 20206
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by SDR »

15-20 years to complete---so, as long or longer than one of the Great Pyramids---in the industrial age ? The Empire State building was completed in less than 13 months . . .

I'm not suggesting that the Mile High was a practical solution, to any problem. As to locale, why didn't Wright propose it as a centerpiece to the decentralized Broadacre City, rather than an intrusion in the middle of an existing metropolis ? Granted, Broadacres came from an earlier decade---but its (literal) high points were no more than idealized St Mark's or Price towers, weren't they ?

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10575
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: The Illinois 'Mile-High' Tower Architectural Model

Post by Roderick Grant »

The World Trade Center - number one - traces all the way back to 1943, when the idea of such a center was first discussed. Minoru Yamasaki was named architect in 1962, and the design as built was first published in 1964, to guffaws from the architectural community. (There was a pastime back then to determine who was the worst name architect practicing, Minoru Yamasaki or Edward Durrell Stone. Stone usually won, since his work was everywhere present.) The not-quite-finished complex was opened in 1973. Those crafty Egyptians eschewed bureaucracy.

As to why FLW planned it for Chicago, that's where the potential backers, who commissioned the tower, were from. Frank always followed the money.

Post Reply