RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

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juankbedoya
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by juankbedoya »

g.dorn wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 8:48 am
you can get the web link of the images , via looking into the page source then images
NIce pictures..!!

Roderick Grant
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by Roderick Grant »

In my estimation, Edmund Teske was the best photographer of FLW's work, though not necessarily in an informative way. Guerrero's photos tell much more about the structural reality of FLW's buildings, while Teske's are more poetic. Teske was a "shadowy" character, and that shows in all his photography.

juankbedoya
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by juankbedoya »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Wed May 13, 2020 10:55 am
In my estimation, Edmund Teske was the best photographer of FLW's work, though not necessarily in an informative way. Guerrero's photos tell much more about the structural reality of FLW's buildings, while Teske's are more poetic. Teske was a "shadowy" character, and that shows in all his photography.
I haven't heard about Teske but of course I have seen his pictures I suppose. Could you share us some Teske's pictures..?

Roderick Grant
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by Roderick Grant »

Juan,

Google "Edmund Teske Photography" for an overview of his work, dating back to his early years in Chicago, where as a child he often rode the trolley past Midway Gardens. "Edmund Teske AND Frank Lloyd Wright Photography" shows his brief time as FLW's official photographer at Taliesin in the '30s and his stay in Residence B at Barnsdall in the '40s. You will come across an image of a woman with closed eyes superimposed over images of Olive Hill; she was Edmund's sister. He also took a portrait photo of Virginia Kazor in front of the Hollyhock living room fireplace.

Edmund developed a process which his friend Edward Steichen dubbed "duotone solarization," which gives Teske's work an otherworldly quality, especially effective in his Mono Lake series. He used the process for a large collection of photos of Jim Morrison (also available on Google). One image was used for an album cover. I don't know which one.

There are a few books of Teske's work available on Amazon for modest prices.

juankbedoya
Posts: 111
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by juankbedoya »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 1:02 pm
Juan,

Google "Edmund Teske Photography" for an overview of his work, dating back to his early years in Chicago, where as a child he often rode the trolley past Midway Gardens. "Edmund Teske AND Frank Lloyd Wright Photography" shows his brief time as FLW's official photographer at Taliesin in the '30s and his stay in Residence B at Barnsdall in the '40s. You will come across an image of a woman with closed eyes superimposed over images of Olive Hill; she was Edmund's sister. He also took a portrait photo of Virginia Kazor in front of the Hollyhock living room fireplace.

Edmund developed a process which his friend Edward Steichen dubbed "duotone solarization," which gives Teske's work an otherworldly quality, especially effective in his Mono Lake series. He used the process for a large collection of photos of Jim Morrison (also available on Google). One image was used for an album cover. I don't know which one.

There are a few books of Teske's work available on Amazon for modest prices.
I have done it, but I found only humans pictures and a picture of residence b ... no more about Wright's buildings... Sometimes not everything is found in google

SDR
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by SDR »

One has to read between the lines with RG, sometimes; perhaps he meant for you to search this site for "Edmund Teske AND Frank Lloyd Wright Photography":

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewto ... hotography

S

SDR
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by SDR »

I've been looking at the first photograph on this page, and I've finally noticed what makes it so eerie: the sky is dark, instead of light. How did Mr Teske achieve that effect ? Is it paint ? The smoggy years in LA were never that bad, were they ?

I detect faint signs of writing and other marks, in that dark field. Maybe he collaged a lightly used piece of carbon paper . . .

S

Rood
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by Rood »

SDR wrote:
Sat May 16, 2020 10:12 pm
I've been looking at the first photograph on this page, and I've finally noticed what makes it so eerie: the sky is dark, instead of light. How did Mr Teske achieve that effect ? Is it paint ? The smoggy years in LA were never that bad, were they ?
I detect faint signs of writing and other marks, in that dark field. Maybe he collaged a lightly used piece of carbon paper . . . S
Professional photographers occasionally darken portion of a photograph, during the process of development.

For instance, I have a large Black and White Ansel Adams print ... Aspens: New Mexico-1958 ... which is a close-up view of a grove of tall, skinny aspen trees ... some 35 trees in all, but only the most forward six shows their white bark. Adams darkened all the trees behind those six to provide dramatic contrast.

I'm confident Teske did something similar ... almost erasing the sky and the background clutter of the city in order to focus on the building.

SDR
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by SDR »

I've heard about "dodging," where a tool is held over the print being exposed to deny parts of the image their full share of light. In this case, the roof in the foreground is so sharply defined against the (artificially ?) darkened sky that only a paper cutout placed directly on the paper would seem to have worked. But of course there may be any number of other tools and techniques. We know that Wright and co. were handy with the paintbrush . . .

I am amused by the two versions of the classic Robie photo. The modified photo appeared not long after the house was completed. I'm not sure which is the better view of the building.

Image
Image

Tom
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by Tom »

I like the top shot but the bottom shot isolates the living room roof cantilever which is cool.

SDR
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by SDR »

The foreground tree left of center exists only in its foliage and upper trunk; the bole has disappeared. Two other street trees have been "moved" to behind the house.

I could have sworn I had seen a third version, in which one or more of the three trees had moved only as far as the "front yard"---behind the wall but in front of the house---but I find no such photo now.

It's hard to tell from this photo whether or not the street is paved---and if so, with what material . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by Roderick Grant »

The process that Teske used is the "duotone solarization" I mentioned in the post. It consists of printing two negatives at once, but how the light becomes dark and the dark light I don't know. Probably some chemical manipulation.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by SDR »

Thanks. In that top photo, the preternaturally dark sky is reminiscent of a trick occasionally employed in movie-making, as when a late afternoon effect is desired, on a shot made at midday: a partial filter is employed on the upper-most band of the frame, to darken the sky. One example can be found in a scene in "Topkapi," at the outdoor wrestling match; the director needs to suggest that night is coming, where the principle action of the film will take place. But the effect is spoiled a bit, as the darkening of the sky takes in a couple of tall buildings as well !

Something more subtle and complex is going on in Teske's photo, presumably, as the building in the foreground is unaffected . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: RESIDENCE B - Hollyhock House

Post by Roderick Grant »

The first of the three photos is a double-negative exposure in the background, but the other two are not. All Teske photographs tend to be on the dark side, even his view of the steps at Taliesin in the snow. Go back to "Edmund Teske Photography" - without Frank - to find examples of the process. In duotone solarization, it's the 'duo' that makes the difference. His book, "Images From Within," available on Amazon from a high of $111.70 to a low of $17.61, is an excellent source.

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