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ebay: FLW drawings and blueprints

Posted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 2:58 pm
by DavidC

Posted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 8:40 pm
by SDR
A Christie "Standard Detail" sheet for a shop structure reveals some specifics of the Usonian kit of parts c. 1940 (?): dimensions and names of parts
of the board-and-sunk-batten wall system and other trim, and a section through the foot of the wall.

This last is curious, and not a version of the condition that I've seen before. A question arises: is the weight of the wall (and thus of the roof) carried
down to the "2" Toncan metal strip" wedged between the edge of the slab and the rowlock course that surrounds the slab ? The two moldings keyed
into the bottom of the first course of boards could not support that weight without rotating outward, out of place---it seems to me. What is the point of
the void, called out at 1/4" in height ?

Another unusual detail is found in the soffit panels of the eaves. I guess they are board and sunk batten as well . . .

Loch Crane's name appears below the title of the sheet; did he make this drawing ? Crane is mentioned in the seller's text as part of the provenance.

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Posted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 1:00 pm
by Thomas
Is this for sale? I actually met Loch Crane, in San Diego.I believe he worked on this project. Did he actually draw this? or is his name on the drawing because he own it?

Posted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 1:14 pm
by SDR
It wouldn't have been signed by Crane when completed; I can't see Wright or anyone else writing his name there, in ink---so I have to assume that Crane or someone else did it later.

Buy it---it would be great to have it "in the family." I would guess that it's never been published, and while it's not signed by Wright (the price would be much higher if it were) it appears to be a genuine blackline repro with original color added.

I'd love to know what the two small notes to the wall section, far right of the sheet, say !

Incidentally, the main and secondary title lettering is so regular that one suspects that it was made with a Leroy or similar lettering device. One sees this very occasionally on Taliesin sheets, I believe . . .

S