Article: H.H. Richardson train station - Holyoke, MA

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DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Article: H.H. Richardson train station - Holyoke, MA

Post by DavidC »


SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

The heavy horizontal banding in contrasting stone, high on the building and low, is striking; the "mitered" or continuous condition at the corners is
even more so. We know Richardson couldn't have been influenced by Wright---this building is dated 1883---but the reverse could certainly be so.

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

It would not have taken FLW coming into contact with a Richardson-designed station to be inspired. There were thousands of them all over the country, mostly along the same lines. My small home town (4,800 souls) had 3 stations, Great Northern, Rock Island, Burlington. All 3 followed the same basic plan. Rock Island was made with yellow brick, otherwise little difference. All gone now. There hasn't been a passenger train through Pipestone since before the war.

SDR
Posts: 19462
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Minnesota, 1948:

https://trains.rockycrater.org/graphics ... n-1948.jpg


I was thinking specifically of the continuous "mitered" banding on the Richardson building, in connection with Wright. In "Architecture: the Natural
and the Manmade" V Scully investigates medieval fortifications in France, and describes walls "bound together with one strong stringcourse" and
". . . the monumental half-round stringcourse with which Le Notre bound his island citadel [at Chantilly] is the twin of the stringcourse that Vauban
invariably used, running like a cannon shot along his walls." (Such fortifications, by the fifteenth century, were built, in fact, to resist the stone and
then iron balls of the newly-invented cannon.)

I like the image of a fat round molding "running like a cannon shot" along a wall . . .

S

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

Could the medieval strain have come from Viollet-le-Duc? Among his other accomplishments he documented the Gothic cathedrals and headed up the restorations of Notre Dame and Carcassonne, both grossly inauthentic by modern standards.

SDR
Posts: 19462
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Well, Scully mentions Viollet-le-Duc repeatedly; the last entry in this book is in the same chapter,
where he says (p 278) that Viollet-le-Duc "has marvelous drawings of" structures to be built behind
stone fortification walls, ready to trap an assault if and where it might successfully breach the walls . . .

Shades of Leonardo ? We know of course that Wright mentions V-le-D as an influence.

And here's a Scully image of a string-coursed wonder by Vauban ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebastien ... _de_Vauban ):


Image

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