Zillow: Fay Jones house - Fayetteville, AR

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DavidC
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Zillow: Fay Jones house - Fayetteville, AR

Post by DavidC »


jay
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Post by jay »

Interesting how much red brick is present on the approach to the house, and immediately entering it (pictures 3-7)... It's peculiar to see Fay Jones using brick instead of the "Ozark" stone he was so fond of.... The entry walks into the massive backside of the hearth, which appears to create a nice drama for then entering the main space.
And the mitered corner windows on the far living space wall (picture 18 ) made me gasp. What a dazzling effect.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I'd take this house in a heartbeat, for its generous workshop space as well as its more obvious charms !

S

DRN
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Post by DRN »

I firmly believe that once Jones architecturally found his “voice� ca. 1955, he was incapable of designing an unpleasant house.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes.

If you were a Frank Lloyd Wright you couldn't possibly pass on your magic to someone lacking their own sense of space, of shelter, of material---but one
who had that, could learn a lot from you---and some did, bringing of course their own ideas, their own feeling to the task.

There are really only six or seven, or eight or nine of them altogether, and few did work so unoriginal that it might be mistaken for Wright's own. Jones might
have made the most bold and at the same time the most refined of this work, in his own way, of any of them . . . the most luxurious maybe, too ?

I guess the same could be said of Aaron, and of Jack ? Schindler, Lautner, Harris, Hillmer and Mills went somewhat further afield in their search for residential
form. For me the list thins from there . . .

Who did I miss, of the first order, or not ?

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

There is another brick Jones house, published in HB June 1962 pg 81, with the headline, "A good $27000 house is not impossible." It also did not employ his usual ceiling trim, but exposed the rafters and T&G roofing.

jay
Posts: 283
Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

Who did I miss, of the first order, or not ?
I have a soft spot for the architects who didn't necessarily reach for heights as high as Wright or Lautner; the architects who more quietly attempted to realize the ideals of the Usonian concept in residential settings.

Ted van Fossen's work at Rush Creek Village and Milton Stricker's many works around Seattle are two shining examples that spring to mind.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Indeed. And it seems that we continue to find more of these worthies, from time to time. My observation is that each one of them, except for the least
talented perhaps, find something of their own to contribute---some form or detail which for whatever reason never occurred or appealed to Mr Wright,
the father of all their efforts . . .?

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

To your list, SDR, I would add Mills, Beharka, Stricker, McDonald, and Hillmer's partner, Charles Warren Callister. Of a later generation, Kelly Davis.

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

jay wrote:Interesting how much red brick is present on the approach to the house, and immediately entering it...It's peculiar to see Fay Jones using brick instead of the "Ozark" stone he was so fond of....
Here is another wonderful Fay Jones house with brick - the Sequoyah Project from 1956.


David

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

It almost seems as if the brick houses and the stone houses were designed by two different architects, two different very good architects. There is a different feel to the lesser known brick houses that I like, a simplicity that is sometimes lacking in the grander of the stone houses, which can at times be overly articulated. I guess that's in the nature of the materials.

jay
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Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

Beautiful!
So interesting to see pronounced horizontals (as opposed to pronounced verticals) plus the absence of the ornamental fixtures that Jones so commonly used. The deck railing is perhaps the only "signature" Jones detail, both vertical and ornamental? (And a mild one at that.)
I particularly like the living room nook, brings to mind Milton Stricker's built-in nooks. Also love the two outdoor areas, patio and deck, on each side of the house. What other modest-size "in-line" homes have that? Brandes...

DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

Though you can't see it in any of the pictures shown, this house contains Jones' last known design: he created a railing for the stairs that lead from the carport into the entry near the kitchen. He had been retired (via illness) for some years at this point and did it as a gift to the homeowner. Besides having the edges of the railing rounded over he routed out a groove on the underside of it facing towards the outside of the railing. It gives the fingers and hands a wonderful 'grip/feel' as you ascend or descend the stairs. A small, and wonderful, detail.


David

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Was Maurice Jennings working for Fay Jones when the brick houses were designed ? Perhaps those are his work . . .?

S

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

Jennings started w/ Jones in 1973. The first home on this page is from 1966. The second from 1956.


David

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