Model of Taliesin 1

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SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I'm enough of a tight-ass when it comes to consistency in design that I would endorse, as an alternative to total 1:1 replication of every wall on the property,
a idealized/averaged "wallpaper" of Taliesin I masonry, to be used throughout a model, with the design of the panel so arranged---including, presumably,
the use of rotation---that no repeats of the pattern were easily discernible.

Fallingwater is the other notable instance of this kind of masonry, with enough surface, laid over a period of time, that there are variations in the thickness of
projectors, the thickness range of courses, the length of projectors, the number of projectors per sq yd, etc etc. throughout the ensemble of structures.

The characteristic texture of the stone at Fallingwater differs markedly from that at Taliesin: While at Taliesin the projectors, as we said, are fairly thick, those
at Fallingwater are much skinnier. This of course reflects the characteristics of the material, including choices made at the quarry in each case ?

There are clunkers in both of these houses---pieces of wall best left unremarked. Yet all is of interest, most is superior, and a few bits are off the charts---
fabric of the (masonry) gods ?




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Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Another house, the study of which may be fructifying, is Lovness.
All of the stonework in the principal structure was carefully arranged by Virginia, using her considerable artistic talents to contrive a regularity
that other masons on other jobs (including Lovness Cottage), getting the hang of things along the way, may not have achieved.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Looking for images of the Lovness structures I came across this---which includes a photo of tiny Virginia at age 92:

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/sto ... right-home

S

JimM
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Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Post by JimM »

SDR, can't say I'd expect 1:1 accuracy on anything, but you do describe a perfectly logical approach to digital masonry.

No doubt clunky stuff going on there at T1! Assume due to trial and error and Wright specifying masons-who otherwise were most likely very good at their craft-to "think different(ly)"...even the perfectionist in Steve Jobs did not translate over to Apple's use of grammar!

Interesting Wright would have no issue with so many inconsistencies with the masonry for his own home; but then he later fondly recalled a mason by their work. He must have found the individuality, regardless of results, to be an integral part of Taliesin's creation. This was not so much the case in later years; similar results from amateur masons, but at no cost!

The only place the quality of masonry expected as done by Tafel and Yen Liang must have been rebuilding Hillside?

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes; interesting that they were assigned (?) to produce an example of the earlier Hillside form. Would their pier have had a use, when completed ? I see two slots formed in the masonry at upper right.

What is the house seen in the background, in that photo ?

One opportunity the masons at the Peterson Cottage missed was the inclusion of "stickouts" that wrap around the corners of the masonry mass---as in every example in the photos above. However; those nearest the corner, on
the end elevation at least, were brought to an equal distance from that arris, resulting in a consistent row of highlights as seen at a particular moment of the day . . .



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Photo 1995 Thomas Heinz

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Last edited by SDR on Sat Dec 14, 2019 12:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

juankbedoya
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Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Post by juankbedoya »

JimM wrote:Thanks so much for posting this! We had information on this collaboration with Taliesin Preservation a year or so ago. Since then I've been checking back hoping to see the promised video on the SkylineInk site. For some reason they still only have a still photo and not the video (?). I never thought to Google Vimeo...

Regardless, even what little of the video they let out at the time was very informative, and a special thanks to TP. To see this now is indeed a treat. Although certain aspects may not be completely accurate, with their abilities I wish they had depicted the "stick-out" masonry more faithfully. I also feel that since Wright's own descriptions of Taliesin are fairly specific, and with TP involvement, a color rendition would have been preferable (although I do respect their "period appropriate" black and white decision for all those nebulous historic restoration justifications!). Thanks again for posting.

There's really no reason, actually impossible, to "compare" T1, 2, & 3 as individual entities. Still, as originally conceived and executed the beauty and originality of T1 was on a level all its own, IMO. The extensive laboratory and campus it became is not as cohesive versus the simplicity of T1... all things considered, the heart of Taliesin has always been the living room, and arguably the one place the original spirit has remained throughout its evolution.
you're welcome... in fact, did you watch the Bruce Goff videos made by skyline ink? (those are amazing recreations of built and unbuilt projects..!!). I'm agree with you is a delightful to watch Taliesin I alive

juankbedoya
Posts: 179
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Post by juankbedoya »

Roderick Grant wrote:The simplicity of T-I gives it the cohesion that the vast, rambling T-III lacks; it is more residence and less 'corporate campus.'

As the living room is the heart of the interiors, the tower is the exclamation point of the exterior which has not been changed too much.
On the other hand, the studio of T-III - a magical space in its own right - is superior to T-I.

The video, with the minor exception of the stonework, is a marvelous thing! One thing about computer videos is that they can be altered.
A color version could be made, and cleaning up the stones would not be too difficult, would it?
I'm agree with you is. That simplicity is what gives it the forcefulness, beauty and spirit to Taliesin I. I'd like to see Taliesin I, somewhere, someday, stand.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

+1 ! 8) S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

SDR, good question about he house in the background. I cannot imagine that the pier Tafel and Liang have built was anywhere other than someplace on Taliesin property, and the only structure I can imagine being on the property is the old house behind Midway Barn. The stone elements in the barn are what? sandstone or limestone? The pier in the photo is obviously limestone, and may have been the beginning of the barn, which may have preceded renovation of the house.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »


SDR
Posts: 19697
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I found what I was hoping to, another photo showing the house behind Tafel and Liang. The first photo is on page 38 of Tafel, "Apprentice to Genius."

The accompanying photo is on page 161 of the same book. In neither case does the author address the specifics in his text.

Is that a bit of the Hillside drafting studio, under construction in the foreground of the second picture ?


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