Wright Model Making?

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SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

One problem with the typical architectural model is its usefulness in conveying the building design as it is perceived by the typical visitor/user. That is,
we look at the building from above, not from ground level (in most cases)---and even then, we don't get close enough to the structure to get a sense
of scale or to take in any intimate detail---much less to glimpse some of the interior as it is encountered in use.

The enclosure of the model in an acrylic box more or less ensures that the above problems will be encountered "in spades."

An alternate to the typical model, as a counter to these demerits, might be a wall-mounted partial model: a full-relief portion of the building, perhaps
encompassing the first three feet of the structure beyond the principal exterior wall. In the case of a Wright Usonian, for instance, this would include
the full exterior expression, including wall surface, fenestration, roof, some portion of the "overhead," slab, and other detail inside the glass, and ex-
terior hardscape (and even landscape) features extending perhaps no more than four feet outside the wall---at whatever scale seemed appropriate,
something between 1/4" and 3/4"= 1'-0" ?

The model would be hung at eye level; a choice would have to be made whether, and how, to accommodate those of less than adult stature ...

I would expect such a model to include full-color representations of the materials found in the building, but a monochromatic basswood expression
would appeal to many, I'm sure. Glazing would be an option; some would prefer to be able to see inside more easily, while others might value the
verisimilitude of actual glazing. Cleaning---by means of photographer's "canned air" ?---would be easier without glass, I suppose.

S

David
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Post by David »

Roderick Grant wrote:David, some things take a long time. You are building a reputation that will serve you well in the future.

"Profit-taking as a motive for a civilization does not seem to be the ennobling basis for one."
Frank Lloyd Wright
Architectural Forum
January 1938
Thanks, Roderick! I agree with you and with Mr. Wright! My Hooked on The Past project, apart from being a labor of love, has given me much personal and professional satisfaction, I don't complain at all.

Matt2
Posts: 198
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Post by Matt2 »

Some designs model better than others. A one-story Usonian design at a small scale isn't much of a model...little better than looking at a plan drawing. Other designs or parts of projects work well in drawing the viewer in to imagining themselves passing around and through a space.

SDR
Posts: 18806
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes. But to do that, you have to get down and, if possible, in ?

I wonder if the roofs come off of the Fallingwater model. I guess, to see the main level, the whole second and third levels would have to lift off.

The digital model, with walk-through, must be said to offer a more intimate experience. The charm of the physical model lies somewhere else, it seems
to me. If its unique qualities and advantages could be precisely identified, it would help the builder to make certain choices---including scale, material,
accessibility, positioning, etc. Otherwise, it's just a pretty object ?

S

jay
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Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

“The only way to really perceive a ‘space form’ is by being inside of it.� -- R.M. Schindler

In Hildebrand's book on the Palmer House, there's a photo of a model done by University students, with a semi-open roof frame form that really pulls you into the details of the design/construction... Pretty neat stuff.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Jay kindly forwards the model photo from the Hildebrand book; I include Storrer's plan of the house, oriented to match.

By happy accident, we also have Jeff Myers's SketchUp model of the house, from the same angle:

Image
Image
Image

SDR
Posts: 18806
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

An interesting moment in that framing model is the west leg of the roof "tripod," the one which passes over the kitchen on its way toward
the approach; its penetration of the wall between kitchen and carport must have concerned the builder---as to sequence, if nothing else ?

I can't find the odd free-standing diagonal, above the projecting roof at left, in any other photo of this corner of the house ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mishpo/3724478122

S

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