Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

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juankbedoya
Posts: 137
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

Post by juankbedoya »

It seems that this house is one of the favorite of many people and was looking for info of it, but there is only few pictures of the exterior... So please if you have floor plans, section, pictures... share us... by the way... why is so adored..?

SDR
Posts: 19291
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

There are a number of color pics at Google Image. Here is William Storrer's info and description of the house; if the project is special, it may be for the reason he gives, namely the choice of material.

I am especially fond of the early exterior view Storrer publishes; the house could be the model for a Plasticville "modern house"...



Image

Image

Image

All, © 1993 by William Allin Storrer

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4309
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

The angle of the photo above makes Shavin look very similar to Seth Peterson.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 19291
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

There is a similarity; though the plans of the houses are different, in both cases the living room is at far left in the views and the kitchen occupies the major masonry block.

And, the masonry is nearly identical in both cases. Two views of Peterson:


Image . . . Image

juankbedoya
Posts: 137
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Re: Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

Post by juankbedoya »

Finally I found some pictures of this house in the link below:

http://www.steinerag.com/flw/Artifact%2 ... 339Elk.htm

SDR
Posts: 19291
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

Post by SDR »

Many a mid-century architect took steps in the direction that Wright proposed by his example; few went the extra mile to achieve what Wright did. The thickness of the roof, the deep cant of its fascia, the no-holds-barred honesty of the masonry---these are the hallmarks of The Real Thing.

And the masons here caught the full spirit: unlike the work at the Peterson cottage, the corners are correctly treated in the matter of the projecting stones.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File ... ouse_2.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/72/e1/61 ... 7a53b8.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/3f/7b/03 ... a4bd5f.jpg

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10121
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

Post by Roderick Grant »

Levin, Eppstein, Lovness Cottage and Griggs are 4 shed roofed houses I have been in. There is something unique about a house with a shed roof. It presents the view more directly than any other kind of roof, simple and straightforward. I would like to experience Shavin directly, as well as Beecher Roberts, Dobkins, Harper and Alpaugh.

SDR
Posts: 19291
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

Post by SDR »

Wright's Usonian shed roofs usually strike me---in photos---as extraordinarily steep. One way to read this, if true, is that the contrast between the pitched and flat roofs in these houses---there are always flat-roofed portions of the plans---is accentuated. I suppose this can't be the only factor affecting Wright's judgements where this element is concerned . . .

When you say that the view is "presented more directly," do you refer to the fact that more of the view---the sky, in particular---is visible from wherever in the room you happen to be ?

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10121
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Seamour and Gerte SHAVIN House

Post by Roderick Grant »

Not more sky. A shed roof is the simplest type of roof. It draws attention outward more readily than horizontal flat roofs or any sort of folded plate roof. This may be in my imagination, not having studied the situation even while in one of the shed roofed houses. But from every angle, inside and out, shed is simpler.

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