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dkottum
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Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

I think what we may have here in Palmer is an evaporative cooling system (swamp cooler) rather than a compressor system. The hot, dry desert air is drawn into the system, water is added as vapor in the air, thereby reducing air temperature.

The cool air is not recycled (because it is now more humid, cooler and less effective), but simply passed through the plenum where some of it is drawn into the rooms. Here the cooled plenum becomes a barrier to the heat of the roof, and most of the moist cool air is exhausted at the ends of the roof through FLW's stylish louver arrangement.

This is 1948 or so, probably not effective enough for today's desert dwellers, but perhaps more suitable to FLW's dislike of air conditioning. Times and expectations have changed.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Finally did see the note in large living room section calling out perforated boards in ceiling of AC.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

So the swamp cooling system would draw air through a wet filter by a fan - is that right?

btw - inverted lapped wood ceiling of living room is carried through on other side of chimney into dining room even though dining room roof is flat above.
So in dining room from bottom of ceiling "keel" to floor is 6'-4".

wonderful variations of volume in this house

Rood
Posts: 1174
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

dkottum wrote:I think what we may have here in Palmer is an evaporative cooling system (swamp cooler) rather than a compressor system. The hot, dry desert air is drawn into the system, water is added as vapor in the air, thereby reducing air temperature.

The cool air is not recycled (because it is now more humid, cooler and less effective), but simply passed through the plenum where some of it is drawn into the rooms. Here the cooled plenum becomes a barrier to the heat of the roof, and most of the moist cool air is exhausted at the ends of the roof through FLW's stylish louver arrangement.

This is 1948 or so, probably not effective enough for today's desert dwellers, but perhaps more suitable to FLW's dislike of air conditioning. Times and expectations have changed.
Unfortunately, Wright's system would not have worked very well. In fact, cool air from the system wouldn't have become a barrier to roof heat, as much as the roof heat would have warmed the cool air.

The ideal Swamp Cooler system brings in cool air near the floor, and exhausts warm air high up, through roof or clerestory openings. This is exactly the reverses of the Palmer system ... which I'm sure would have been abandoned during the first summer.

Also ... in Phoenix, Swamp Coolers work fine in the first few months of summer ... late April, May, and June, which are typically very dry, but with the onset of "Monsoon" conditions ... i.e. humid conditions and heavy summer rains .... the system breaks down.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I'm still wondering which project is illustrated by the colored rendering on page two . . .

I assume it's the desert; is that a recognizable mountain or hill in the background ?

S

dkottum
Posts: 427
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

SDR, I believe the colored rendering is an earlier version of the sheets that follow it. Compare to the southeast elevation, working drawing. Master bedroom is to the left with less glass in front, entrance in the center, and childrens' bedrooms to the right.

Unsure of the mountain behind it but could represent one of many in the area, the grass in front surely isn't desert landscape but may follow the idea of the grass and pool in front of Taliesin West, whatever that is. Perhaps taking away the heated reflective surface of the natural desert?

This house design seems to use a number of ideas to cool the house. Very large roof overhangs to shade the sides of the house and its terraces. Shade from trees near the house and plantings for the trellised roof edges. High window openings to exhaust warm air, while bringing indirect light deep into of the spaces. It seems the large overhead plenum, with enough air flow through it, would exhaust much of the roof underside surface heat out the louvers at the ends.

Were compressor air conditioning systems available for family homes like this in 1948? Or did they have to rely on swamp coolers and passive design ideas such as we see here?

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »


Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Also the color rendering shows a version of the plan in which there is a pass
through at the end of the bedroom wing separating the bedrooms from a guest room.

The mountain in the background seems to interfere with the interpretation of the house.
Probably should have been rendered just a little bit lighter.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Thanks, Doug, I see it now. The roofing material, like so much else with this house, is a novelty for Wright---which is saying something . . .!

The roof color in the rendering is certainly a surprise; one thinks of, for instance, Walker--or the metalwork of Grandma House ?





Image

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

The "Tapertex" is described as giving a deeper line at the joints.

https://archive.org/details/FlintkoteRoofingsAndSidings

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

I found this video appended to an article about Kalita Humphreys Theater:
It would appear from the words at the s of the video that W. Kelly Oliver might be or have sold some drawings....not sure if all of what we are seeing came from him.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oahp7sFkWpQ

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Who is W Kelly Oliver ?

The narrator of the video DRN links---a spokesman for the Heritage Auctions ?---makes some interesting statements; he says that young Mr Wright
aspired to the stage: of the Kalita Humphreys theater Wright is supposed to have said, "This theater is the one thing I simply must build before they put
me in a box." Can that quote be verified ?


House drawings for Mr & Mrs Sterling E Kinney (1955 ?); Mr & Mrs Louis Penfield (1952); Mr & Mrs Gregor S Affleck (1940); Mr & Mrs Gerald Sussman
(1956); and Mr & Mrs A D Barton (1956) are presently up on the Heritage Auctions pages.

These are all Wright projects; versions of most of them are seen in the pages of Taschen Vol III. The Barton drawings are mentioned in Taschen as missing.

The Affleck drawings, given a date of 1940 and said to have been constructed in that year, are in fact of a second project for the client, prepared in
1952 (Taschen, p 287). The rendering at Heritage Auctions would correspond to the one shown in the book, a view from the opposite side of the
house, a beautiful drawing in the style of Jack Howe.

The Gerald Sussman project usually seen is a Usonian Automatic---in fact, taken as the prototype of the traveling exhibition house of 1988. The project
illustrated by drawings at the auction house are of another design for Sussman, this time to be located at the other end of Westchester County from Rye,
in "Poundridge" (actually, Pound Ridge). This house is of concrete block and wood. It is detailed in a well-preserved and much-annotated drawing set.

Likewise, the lost A D Barton house, designed for Pointer's Grove, IL, is seen in a full set of drawings---a relaxed and breezy version of a typical Taliesin
CD set, confidently drawn if a little vague in places, and lettered in an unusually hasty fashion. Indeed, confidence oozes all over these drawings: the
renderings are clearly done by a more-than-competent illustrator, going Wright one better in loose over-drawing of foliage, a surprising amount of
brown ink or pencil. The accompanying drawings contain occasional oddities: unit line off-center of trellis construction; ". . .screws 16" O.C. lined up with
each other . . ." (Sussman millwork sheet).

A lot of work went into these various drawings; they are worth an extended period of study. I wish I knew whom to credit for all of them.


Here, by way of comparison, are renderings of the Sterling Kinney project #1, as found on page 408 of Taschen III, and on the HA site. Unfortunately,
the published drawing is at such small scale in Taschen that the blow-ups are coarse in texture compared to the well-photographed (and remarkably crisp
and pristine) sheet newly presented.

A plot plan and elevations appear with the Heritage Auctions rendering (the paler one, below). On the HA elevations, on the plan as presented in
Taschen, and on the Taschen rendering (top) there are 4 + window bays to the living room. The HA rendering shows 6 + windows---the odd man out.

Would a Taliesin drafter really be that careless ? And how---when, clearly, working from the same base drawing . . . ?



Image
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Image

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S

SDR
Posts: 19704
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Several hours spent today in the company of Bill Schwarz, looking at the Paul Palmer, Kinney, Penfield, Affleck, Sussman and A D Barton house drawings, have convinced me that the work came from the Taliesin drafting
rooms. Bill's time at Taliesin in the early 'sixties acquainted him with Davy Davison, David Wheatley and others; he recognized both their hands---as well as Howe's and Wright's---on the various sheets presented by Heritage
Auctions.

Now the question is, where did these drawings come from ? The video seems to address only the Kalita Humphreys Theater drawings, with the inference that they came from Kelly Oliver's collection. Did the house drawings
also come from him ? Bill says that Mr Oliver is still with us (at perhaps 90 years of age) . . .

Now I see at least three further house drawing sets at the auction site. More to see . . .

S

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »


Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

This one too was not there a couple of days ago.

https://fineart.ha.com/itm/decorative-a ... ition=0|12

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