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Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

That the color of one's irises (subtly) affects perception of colors shouldn't seem too hard to understand.

Not that it is relevant to the current discussion, but a study showed that workers who were exposed to fluorescent lighting day-long, which has become omnipresent in offices over the past 60 years, are 50% more likely to contract skin cancer than workers who spend all their time outside in the sunlight.

DRN
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Post by DRN »

It might also be conjectured that people who work outside gradually acquire a tan and have fewer sun burns which contribute to skin cancer, whereas office workers with their pasty pallor might burn more frequently....

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

As far as I know, the study was not based on conjecture.
Not all office workers are pasty.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Sorry---I'm not buying it . . .

http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=4578

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

At the risk of starting a non-architectural haggle that might go on for 80 or 90 pages, I must say that the UCSB response to the question is neither conclusive nor convincing. As far as it goes about the function of the iris, it is correct. But what it doesn't do is offer proof that the light entering the pupil is unaffected by the color of the iris. That would be similar to saying wearing shades -- blue, brown, green -- doesn't alter color perception.

To imply that the only reason for blue vs brown is the propensity for blue eyes to suffer sun damage more readily (which they do, as; my cataract surgery attests to) must be augmented by an explanation of why blue eyes came into existence in the first place, all of us on Earth tracing our origins to Africa. The fact is, blue eyes are common to Nordic folk because of the lower level of sunlight for much of the year. In other words, blue eyes must collect more light than brown, and in so doing, retinal cones notwithstanding, have more of an impact on sight than merely controlling the size of the pupil.

Check out the site's list of "scientists." It looks more like a complete catalogue of UCSB's undergraduates.

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

Two comments, first regarding this:
Look at the habit of many of the Impressionists who framed their modern images in age-old, florid, gilded frames...
I can't speak for all of the Impressionists, but most of those gilded frames were put there by dealers or owners. At Monet's studio at Giverny, the paintings that are framed have simple dark wooden frames. Van Gogh would frame his pictures in plain wooden frames that were painted, usually in a light color that complimented the painting. This continued in the Neo Impressionists where Seurat and Signac did the same. Seurat's masterpiece Un dimanche après-midi à l'Île de la Grande Jatte is still in its original frame, which is plain white. Again, I can't speak for all of the Impressionists, but my understanding is this was the trend.

There were a few reasons for gilded frames. The ornate ones helped these modern pictures fit into 19th century interiors. The gold also helped denote their value as that increased over the years (often the original frames were discarded) and finally gold is actually a pretty neutral color. It separates the painting from the wall in a pleasing manner without introducing a new color.

My second comment regards different colored eyes perceiving color in a different manner. I have never head of this and if Roderick has an article saying so I'd love to read it. I have read many articles that say dark eyed people handle bright sunlight better and also perceive motion better but lighter eyed people tend to see better in the dark. My personal perception has found this to be true as most blue eyed people I know need sunglasses whereas I, and my fellow dark eyed brethren, do not.
Last edited by Meisolus on Fri Apr 26, 2019 9:37 am, edited 2 times in total.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks, Chad, that's very helpful. Your last point is actual news, for a change.

My only disagreement might be that gold very definitely has a color, as I see it (and we are all "prisoners" of our own perceptions, never knowing if other see what we see---a powerful metaphor ?). Gold can vary, but it's always a warm, even "hot" color---isn't it---for a "neutral" ?

S

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

I agree with you that gold isn't a neutral color SDR. I should have said it was "considered" one in my post above. I think it had more to do with the reflectivity than the actual "color" though.

There is a reason that, whenever possible, I buy the same belt with both a silver and gold buckle. Definitely a warm color.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Silver and gold make the perfect pair, silver the "colorless" of the two ?

When very young I conceived of vanilla ice cream that it was the "base," to which must be added the actual flavors (chocolate, strawberry, etc). Only later did I see that vanilla was itself a flavor . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

One of Ginny Kazor's art teachers gave the class the assignment of drawing a silver spoon. Most came back with the expected shades of soft gray with white highlights. The instructor pointed out that silver is very reflective, and that the spoon should have shown all the colors in the immediate environment.

Gold has a similar reflective quality, though tinged with its own color. I believe the difference in the quality of reflection had something to do with the choice of gold for the mirror in the new James Webb telescope.

Whoever chose the gold frames, even with the plain frames, that puce wall would not detract from the quality of Van Gough's "Sunflowers."

peterm
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Post by peterm »

But would puce flatter an Ad Reinhardt, Mondrian, or Moholy-Nagy? The Guggenheim museum was originally founded not to house Van Gogh (not Gough), but non-objective art.

https://www.guggenheim.org/blogs/findin ... ective-art

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

It isn't a matter of flattery or offense. It isn't a real issue.

peter, thank you for pointing out my misspelling. My spelling is atroshus.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Maybe you’re saying that if the art is of high quality, it could hang on any color of wall? I guess I’m not following you...

You claim that puce walls would not detract from Van Gogh’s Sunflowers. Would puce walls not detract from other modern masterpieces, too?

(Your spelling is typically purrfect, so it jumped out to me. Maybe it’s my sensitive blue eyes...)

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The subject of any painting by Titian, Manet, Kandinsky, etc. is contained within its borders, whatever the quality of the painting. The hue of the adjacent walls is irrelevant.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Most museum curators and gallerists would dispute your opinion, stated as fact.

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