FLW & landscape design

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Post Reply
DavidC
Posts: 7397
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

FLW & landscape design

Post by DavidC »

I'm curious as to how much (or little) FLW got involved in the landscape designing aspects of any of his projects. From what I've read/heard he preferred not to have any landscape plantings too close to the house, less it disparage his masterpiece. But I am wondering if he ever got his hands dirty (so to speak) on integrating a detailed landscape site design plan with any of the buildings/properties? And if so, what might be some of the better examples?





TnGuy

Ed Jarolin
Posts: 277
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 1:06 pm
Location: Wyoming

Post by Ed Jarolin »

The best reference I've seen on the subject is the book 'Wrightscapes'

by Charles & Berdeana Aguar. To sum up, Wright was at 'his' best when a

member of his office, Walter Burley Griffin for example, or a client with

an intense interest in horticulture was involved. It is, of course, more complicated than that hence the 300+ page book.

pharding
Posts: 2252
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

FLW did not like foundation planting which was a Victorian idea designed to hide the silly little basement windows at grade. FLW also showed an early preference in the Prairie Houses for a flared base that the house sat on. It made no sense then to hide this wonderful architectural feature. With the more overt abstraction of the Usonian Houses, even in a manicured suburban setting, look better fully exposed without landscaping at the base of exterior wall. In both of those FLW periods did show a fondness for landscaping in planters.
Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

jim
Posts: 237
Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 6:53 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by jim »

Aguar's "Wrightscapes" is clearly the definitive text on this subject, as already noted. It debunks a lot of hooey, finds even more FLlW genius heretofor unappreciated, and all based on solid research and site analysis by a very perceptive landscape architect. Highly recommended!
Jim

HOJO
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Oct 19, 2006 4:11 pm
Location: Belgium

Post by HOJO »

And almost nothing grows under roof or balcony ...

Post Reply