Ziegler Vs. Zeigler

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

From what I've gleaned in just the last couple of years, it would be MAYma CHEEney. Changing habitual spellings and pronunciations is never easy. We like the first version of whatever we learn.

House docents are at the front lines of informing the public; I wonder how much effort is expended to assure that they are dispensing correct information . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

There is also MA'-hun-ee.

Reidy
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Post by Reidy »

The church answered my inquiry. It's Zeigler, not the commoner Ziegler.

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

Thanks Reidy! Did they give any indication of pronunciation?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Heh. Thanks, Reidy. As "Zeegler" rolls off the (American) tongue more readily than "Zygler," it's hard to imagine that the family or anyone else would, after choosing that spelling, turn around and pronounce it Zygler . . . isn't it ?

How would a European pronounce Zeigler, do you know ?

S

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Tzygler

(auf Deutsch)

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Ah -- well, there you have it -- and I should have known better. Sorry, guess it's a topsy-turvy world up here in Frisco !

No guarantee, of course, that the American Zeiglers chose to pronounce it correctly . . .

In New York it's All-bany; in California it's Al-bany. In Texas it's Hyooston; in Manhattan Hows-ton. Grenitch; Green-wich. Quin-zee; Quin-see. Whew -- who can keep up ?

S

HOJO
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Post by HOJO »

peterm wrote:Tzygler

(auf Deutsch)
Y must sound like an I, like in like.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

HOJO

Genau (Exactly).

Zeigler:

Perhaps I should have written Tz(eye)gler, or even more precisely- Tz(eye)glare.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I would offer a slight alteration: 'T', a surd letter, followed by sonant 'z' would be hard to pronounce trippingly off the tongue. A more likely pronunciation would be 'ts', both surd letters.
Thus Ts(eye)g-ler.

peterm
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Post by peterm »

That works, and is easier, yes.

HOJO
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Post by HOJO »

peterm wrote:HOJO

Genau (Exactly).

Zeigler:

Perhaps I should have written Tz(eye)gler, or even more precisely- Tz(eye)glare.

Not 'glare', 'gler' must be pronounced briefly like in wrangler, or (maybe in this case more applicable) like in 'lieber meister'

Emphasis on the first syllable Ts(eye)

peterm
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Post by peterm »

Definitely accent on the first syllable, yes.. And the r sound of American English at the end of a word is mostly dropped. As for the vowel sound at the end of Zeigler or Lieber, it’s really lies somewhere in between “wrangler� and “wranglare�, but you be the judge:

https://youtu.be/wV4kOlwJT2Q

As a general rule, i in German is pronounced as in Mimi, e is pronounced close to our long a, a without an umlaut is ah, a with umlaut: ay as in hay, u is ooh as in boot, the other umlauts being too difficult to explain.

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