Article: 'Rethinking the modern house museum'

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DavidC
Posts: 8040
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Article: 'Rethinking the modern house museum'

Post by DavidC »


jmcnally
Posts: 867
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:23 am

Post by jmcnally »

It's a thought-provoking article, but the sub-headline doesn't get addressed until the very end: today's visitors want to snap at least a quick photo. I applaud the house museums that have recently started allowing photos, a list that now includes the Home & Studio, Taliesin, and Westcott. On the other hand, I ruled out a trip to Polymath Park because they don't even allow exterior photography (unless you buy their meal package).

SDR
Posts: 19776
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Seems a short-sighted policy ? I wonder what the objection to amateur photography would be based on . . .

SDR

Matt
Posts: 430
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:24 am

Post by Matt »

Most museums gave up on prohibiting people from taking photos. In fact, the social media aspect of posting photos helps spread the word about the museum. House museums should use the same approach.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

When I led tours through Hollyhock, there were some restrictions, but not too many. Though no one going through the house could imagine it as a private place with the owners out and about doing errands. Now you have to wear booties, stay off the carpets, stay out of the rooms on display, just peering around the corner, and you can no longer go upstairs, because there are people who cannot negotiate stairs, and if everyone cannot enter the space, no one can. You couldn't pay me enough to give tours through that house again.

The problem with house museums is why I would urge home owners to try their best to keep their home private. With some - Hollyhock, Dana, DD Martin, Fallingwater - it is no longer possible to remain private, but many others certainly could.

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