America's first shopping mall (1957)

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Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

America's first shopping mall (1957)

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10403
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

When Southdale opened, we drove 212 miles just to shop there. It was a wonder, FLW notwithstanding. Dayton's and Donaldson's were the two department stores that anchored the mall. Dayton's was on a par with Bonwit Teller, while Donaldson's was more like Macy's. The bargain basement at Dayton's Downtown became Target.

Someone from Taliesin worked for Gruen in those days, but offhand I cannot recall who it was.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Love the shot of ski wear being modeled to shoppers as they take a break at a café or restaurant . . .

SDR

Meisolus
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Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 8:47 pm
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Post by Meisolus »

The photo of the children in the playground maze is fantastic. It looks like the set from a 1960s variety show. Fab!

jmcnally
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Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:23 am

Post by jmcnally »

I guess it depends on what you call "modern." Northland in Southfield, Michigan, opened in 1954 and was a great example of MCM. Unlike the mall in Minnesota, though, it was an outdoor mall (until about 1975) and its stores were on one level. Also unlike that mall, Wright never had occasion to insult its design.

It had the same designer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northland_Center

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