Taliesin West Road Trip

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pharding
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Taliesin West Road Trip

Post by pharding »

I will be spending Friday in Scottsdale. I will be looking at the original Davenport prints in the FLW archives and going to Forsey's to see the new FLW furniture by Copeland Furniture. I have already toured Taliesin West recently and stayed at the Arizona Biltmore. What are other "must see" FLW attractions in the Phoenix area?



I will likely go with Copeland furniture for the Davenport House. Thus far I am impressed by the quality that I see in their literature. The stained, dark oak is an excellent match to the original stained wood in the Davenport House. Another advantage is the price point which is in the reasonable zone. I am looking forward to seeing the furniture in person.
Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

EJ
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Post by EJ »

My wife and I toured the FLW works in Phoenix a couple of years ago.

I suggest drive bys of the Lykes House and the David Wright House. Both are observable without invading anyone's privacy and they are great houses. The First Christian Church is worth a look, and my wife and I were graciously given a tour by a church employee. The Price winter home is not easily seen from the road, unless you glimpse it as you drive by.



The highlight for me was sitting outside at the Biltmore, enjoying a martini and cigar and just taking in the architecture. What an amazing building, even if Wright was not the principal architect.
"It all goes to show the danger of entrusting anything spiritual to the clergy" - FLLW, on the Chicago Theological Seminary's plans to tear down the Robie House in 1957

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I'm not sure how to acquire the addresses, but any of the work of Will Bruder or Wendell Burnett that you can find would be well worth the effort. Bruder's most prominent work is the Phoenix public library. He also designed an exquisite geology center, I believe in the northwest part of Phoenix. For FLW, although the Adelman House is easy of access, its "remuddling" makes seeking it out not worthwhile. The nearby Boomer House is in fine shape, however.

DRN
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Post by DRN »

The Deer Valley Rock Art Center is Bruder's little gem northwest of Phoenix. It is a visitor center to an outdoor museum of native American petroglyphs.



Boomer (just north of Adelman) was mostly hidden by foliage as of 1998 when I last saw it. By prior arrangement, I was given a brief tour of the Boomer house. It was in good condition. A unique Wright house, rustic, yet crisp, VERY small, yet spacious.



Across the street and just a little north from the Boomer house is a house by either Bruder or Williams/Tsien (I wish I could recall, it was in the mags in the mid-90's) that bridges a wash and recedes into the landscape. Great house.

Doug LaBrecque
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Post by Doug LaBrecque »

Paul, I am eager to hear what you think about the Copeland furniture. I am considering buying 3 barrel chairs. I really am most concerned with the finish. I spoke to someone there, and they are planning on making Origami chairs and other Usonian era furniture by next year. I do hope the price point can stay reasonable. Hope all is well with you, and I do hope to return the visit at some point.
Doug LaBrecque

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Places to tour:



Grady Gammage Auditorium

First Christian Church

Pfeiffer House - on the grounds of Taliesin West. - I was able to participate in a tour of his house by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer a few years back (part of a larger tour of Taliesin West where BBF joined in). Not sure if this is still done at all, though.



Places to drive-by:



Carlson

Boomer

Adelman

Pauson (chimney ruins)

Lykes

Wright

Price

Pieper





TnGuy

wjsaia
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Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:53 pm

Taliesin West Road Trip

Post by wjsaia »

As charming as the little house for Jorgine Boomer is, its overall design and forms nonetheless seem curiously unrelated to its dead flat, desert site, in contrast to the neighboring Adleman house.



The explanation is that Boomer had up for sale a parcel of land but refused to sell it to the Benjamin Adleman family because they were Jews. Wright approached Boomer on behalf of Aldeman and challenged her for her obstinacy. After some negotiations, they struck a deal: she would sell to his Jewish clients on condition that she could select any recent, un-executed design of Wright's and have it built for her as her own residence.



The house Boomer selected had been originally designed for a sloping, seaside site in Carmel, CA, I think, and Mr. Wright agreed to adapt it for situation on another lot Boomer owned, next door to what thereafter became the Adlemans' property.



Bill Schwarz

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

It was called "Sun Bonnet," and looked pretty much the same as the finished product looks. Since Boomer turns away from the hot Arizona sun, the design does in a way make more sense in the desert than on the coast, where an orientation toward the ocean view and the setting sun would have caused considerable heat gain in the afternoon.



I have always wanted to see the interior of the maids room tucked under the roof. It must be too tiny to be photographed, or to be occupied by a normal-sized person. The chauffeur's room, as well. Boomer is one of the most tightly organized houses FLW ever produced.

pharding
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Brief Commentary on Copeland Furniture

Post by pharding »

Doug LaBrecque wrote:Paul, I am eager to hear what you think about the Copeland furniture. I am considering buying 3 barrel chairs. I really am most concerned with the finish. I spoke to someone there, and they are planning on making Origami chairs and other Usonian era furniture by next year. I do hope the price point can stay reasonable. Hope all is well with you, and I do hope to return the visit at some point.
Phoenix / Biltmore Hotel 11.18.06. I was impressed by the quality of the Copeland Furniture. I went to Forsey's, a Phoenix furniture showroom and authorized dealer. They had the full Copeland line except for the Heurtley Lounge Chair and the small dining room table. The workmanship and quality of the quarter sliced white oak and cherry, and the finish were all excellent. The mediocre photographs in the literature and on the web site do not accurately reflect the quality of the furniture and finish system. The barrel chairs were larger in scale than the Cassina Barrel Chairs, which I have. The larger size of the Copeland Barrel Chairs creates a stunning chair that is both beautiful and surprisingly comfortable. This iteration is much better than the Cassina product. This chair wil do extremely well in the residential and commercial marketplace. The fidelity, workmanship, wood, and finish system across all Copeland products were excellent. Minor criticisms. In my humble opinion the cushions are too thick and fluffy. Thinner and denser foam would maintain fidelity to the original and be comfortable at the same time. The nightstand with two drawers is too big for most FLW bedrooms. It is 40" wide. The Coonley nested end tables are spectacular and will also make well scaled nightstands. Forsey's had the showroom tricked out with the help of Talisien West, with premo FLW licensed products and reproduction drawings. They had a $7,000 Yamigawa lamp displayed with two barrel chairs and a Robie tabouret next to the unsupervised front door. Fortunately the bad guys aren't FLW buffs. All things considered Copeland has done a great job and has the FLW line at an attractive price point. I admire their clever strategy of positioning the line in the mainstream marketplace in direct competition with the craftsman lines of Stickley and Warren Hile. This makes this high quality furniture more affordable to us FLW enthusiasts.

CEP
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Taliesin West Road Trip

Post by CEP »

Regarding the Boomer house, I can shine a bit of light on the subject, having done some research on a related writing project. Haven't run into anything in the correspondence I had access to that would imply what 'wjsaia' has written as the explanation of the initiation of the relationship between Wright and Boomer or of anything at all derogatory towards the Adelmans (the only mention is 1952 was that Boomer's sister had seen the adelman house and was interested in the design). Rather, Jorgine Boomer first reached out to Wright in a letter on March 13th, 1945 asking that they speak

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