YODOKO Guest House

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therman7g
Posts: 263
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 11:14 am
Location: Illinois

YODOKO Guest House

Post by therman7g »


JimM
Posts: 1509
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Post by JimM »

Very cool; plans and photos of another seldom published work. What beautiful interiors.



Heresy, but the stone and detailing seem to work better at the scale of this building than the Imperial, which I always thought was quite grandiose.



Any one else see the drama of Fallingwater taking shape?



Thanks for posting!

MHOLUBAR
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oberlin, Ohio

Post by MHOLUBAR »

More than Fallingwater I finally see a context for the Hollyhock House. A beautiful building in a very dramatic site.
mholubar

Reidy
Posts: 1571
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 3:30 pm
Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

Thanks for the lead to this rarely-photographed building. The carved stone appears to be in very good shape. Does anyone know if it's original? They say it decays quickly on exposure to air, especially bad air, and that one of the reasons the Imperial Hotel was lost is that the carvings had rotted out in the smog.



The building is pretty exactly contemporary with Hollyhock, so the resemblance isn't surprising. I understand that it's poured concrete, which Wright wanted but wasn't able to have in LA.



Someone told me a story once of being quite lost in the neighborhood, unable to read or speak any Japanese. An old lady spotted him, took him for a tourist and led him by the arm right up to the house.



Peter

Roderick Grant
Posts: 9864
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

There is a book in Japanese about this house that came out in the 80s. It includes detailed floor plans, elevations and sections, as well as many photographs. One odd thing about it is that the horizontal measurements were executed in the British system, while the verticals were Japanese. This was probably done because the house was built several years after it was designed -- I believe in 1926 -- without FLW's involvement. There may have been a lack of information on elevations and such. It is a wonderful house, a jumble of Western and Eastern elements. But I have long wondered just what is a "lumber room"? That's what's written on a large, almost windowless room on the lower level, set into the hill. Is that some sort of traditional Japanese designation?

therman7g
Posts: 263
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 11:14 am
Location: Illinois

Lumber room

Post by therman7g »

It seems to be a British term.



Source: WordNet (r) 1.7



lumber room

n : (British) a storeroom in a house where odds and ends can be

stored (especially furniture)



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



The phrase "lumber room" is found in British novels at least during the nineteenth century, and the use of the word lumber in this phrase is that found in many obsolescent turns of phrase heard in various English-speaking countries.



The large houses of the well-heeled of Britain commonly had much very old, well-built furniture in them, more than was to be used in every room at any given time. Every piece was made-to-order. When not needed, it was neither sold nor discarded by them. At least one out-of-the-way room was selected to store the pieces that weren't in use. This was called the lumber room.



lumber room n :

room in a household used for storage.

pharding
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Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

What an absolutely wonderful work of architecture. The web site does a great job in documenting the house. Bill Storrer's book has awful photographs of it that do not do it justice. Thank you to therman7g.
Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

jim
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Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2006 6:53 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by jim »

A fine website on a fine house! I also commend to readers Architectural Digest, August 1993, pages. 54, 56, and 58 for an article on the house; (2 exterior and 3 interior photos); and a good discussion of Arata Endo's role in bringing this house to completion.
Jim

SDR
Posts: 18785
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

What a pleasure to finally get to know something useful of this unusual project. There certainly is an affinity to Hollyhock House. It's wonderful to see it in such fine condition. . .and so well presented.



Having read a lot of British fiction, I was pleased to see the discussion of the term "lumber" and now understand how the phrase "lumbered with" (meaning "burdened with") came to be. In fact, my (Amercan) dictionary has the following first definition for "lumber": "miscellaneous discarded household articles, furniture, etc stored away or taking up room." As a woodworker this greatly surprised me ! ("Timber" is the typical British version of our "lumber" or "solid wood.")



(Has anyone seen a British/American translator's dictionary ? The latest Ruth Rendell novel seems to pander to the American audience; we see "in the future" instead of "in future," and "curb" in place of "kerb." It's a pity, really. . .) :wink:



SDR

therman7g
Posts: 263
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 11:14 am
Location: Illinois

Sustaining the Frank Lloyd Wright legacy

Post by therman7g »

Karen Severns and Koichi Mori, founders of the Wrightian Architectural Archives Japan (WAAJ), are on a treasure hunt. Though over a dozen of the designs Wright (1867-1959) created during his time in Japan are accounted for, they say there is likely more out there.



"We're certain there are more," Severn says. She added a plea to anyone who may have skipped spring-cleaning in recent decades: "Hurry. Go up to your attics, go to your storehouses or whatever, because there's information (on Wright) somewhere."



http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asa ... 50120.html

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

When looking for more FLW in Japan, it is wise to realize that several Japanese architects designed buildings that are very similar to Wright's. A book of these buildings was published in the 80s. Just viewing some of the structures, one is very apt to come to the conclusion that FLW did them, when in fact he did not.

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