Article: Desert shelters at Taliesin West

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DavidC
Posts: 7407
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Article: Desert shelters at Taliesin West

Post by DavidC »


DavidC
Posts: 7407
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Re: Article: Desert shelters at Taliesin West

Post by DavidC »


Roderick Grant
Posts: 9895
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Article: Desert shelters at Taliesin West

Post by Roderick Grant »

The shelters are interesting, but those odd chairs in the second shelter are too gimmicky by half. Who designed them?

SDR
Posts: 18838
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Article: Desert shelters at Taliesin West

Post by SDR »

One may not find those chairs pretty, but it should be clear what generated their form: the surrounding structure itself, which plays with rotated rectangles. Indeed it could be that the chairs came first, and the architecture followed (a sequence and scenario especially dear to the heart of the furnitect !). That is, accepting that the right angle formed by the seat and the back of a chair provides an acceptably if not exceptionally comfortable perch, a slight tilting of that arrangement, with both seat and back rotated a few degrees from level and plumb, almost magically improves the comfort of the chair: an acknowledgement that one wants to be more than merely tolerated as a burden to the furniture; one wants actually to be welcomed by it. Then, to provide an environment that is sympatico with the furniture designed for it, wall elements are likewise rotated.

Of course I cannot say if that is what happened in this case---but it is at least a plausible explanation for what we see, a play of function and form of the kind especially dear to the optimistic and idealistic novice architect/philosopher ?

S

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