Roofing/insulation for apprentice house

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Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Thank you.
I'd love to see pics of the rebuild.
Sounds like you've got it well under control.

vortrex
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Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Post by vortrex »

There was mention of the front porch details earlier. Here's a before and after of the window there that I recently restored.

Image

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Nice
Looks like you refinished the hardware too.
What all were the steps involved with this window?

vortrex
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Post by vortrex »

Tom wrote:Nice
Looks like you refinished the hardware too.
What all were the steps involved with this window?
Removed the sash and all hardware. Hand sanded all sides with coarse and medium grits. Patched holes with filler and sanded. Applied a wood conditioner and then two coats of stain to even out the color. Put on three coats of satin spar varnish and fine sanded between coats. The hardware was rusty and losing the original zinc finish. I wanted to get it re-plated but no place would do only a couple small pieces so I sanded it out and primed/painted it. I was doing the redwood ceiling and door frame at the same time. You can see it took so long I went from green grass and shorts to snow. I had to frame out a temp wall to seal in the porch so I could heat it when applying the finishes.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Nice work ! You made multiple flaws disappear, and got the wood color and finish perfectly even. Everything in sight looks better; you did the overhead as well ?

SDR

vortrex
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Post by vortrex »

SDR wrote:Nice work ! You made multiple flaws disappear, and got the wood color and finish perfectly even. Everything in sight looks better; you did the overhead as well ?

SDR
Yes, did the overhead as well but I don't seem to have any finished pictures of it. That was difficult work sanding all three sides of the grooves while working overhead.

On another note, I was able to confirm today that the finished T&G on the ceiling is NOT the 3" decking. I found one spot where I can clearly see the thickness of the ceiling material and the decking below that.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Vortrex: Behind each of the glass to glass joints of the 8ft bronze livingroom slot windows there is a mullion.
From the detail section posted this mullion does not seem to serve any structural purpose.
It's simply backing up the glass to glass joint which I presume is caulked.
Am I right that the mullions do not conceal any support for the sill from the roof above?
If so, have you and your contractor considered doing that?

I remain interested in seeing what you discover about the roof structure.

vortrex
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Post by vortrex »

Tom wrote:Vortrex: Behind each of the glass to glass joints of the 8ft bronze livingroom slot windows there is a mullion.
From the detail section posted this mullion does not seem to serve any structural purpose.
It's simply backing up the glass to glass joint which I presume is caulked.
Am I right that the mullions do not conceal any support for the sill from the roof above?
If so, have you and your contractor considered doing that?

I remain interested in seeing what you discover about the roof structure.
Where do you see the mullions? There is nothing at the glass to glass joint, not even caulk. Are you referring to the double 2x6 posts that are holding up the beam?

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Here are the columns; they do show up in the section (p 4):


ImageImage

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Wow!
From the drawn section detail I saw some lines and simply assumed that the mullions I saw from the exterior were those inside up close to the glass.

Because this is what I thought I missed your explanation.

Now I understand why there are no over head hangers - he wanted uninterrupted glass for the entire length.
Very gutsy. I like it.

... keeping the glass clear does separate the sill from the head structurally - no doubht about that.

So the question for me then becomes what suppports the glass?
And it seems that the sill supports the glass.


If there is then no connection to the head, deflection of the cantilevered sill will make itself know at some point in time somewhere.

You might consider back to back steel angles tied down at the masonry for those cantilevers.
8ft. glass panels are HEAVY.

Beautiful interior by the way.

vortrex
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Post by vortrex »

Tom wrote:Wow!
From the drawn section detail I saw some lines and simply assumed that the mullions I saw from the exterior were those inside up close to the glass.

Because this is what I thought I missed your explanation.

Now I understand why there are no over head hangers - he wanted uninterrupted glass for the entire length.
Very gutsy. I like it.

... keeping the glass clear does separate the sill from the head structurally - no doubht about that.

So the question for me then becomes what suppports the glass?
And it seems that the sill supports the glass.


If there is then no connection to the head, deflection of the cantilevered sill will make itself know at some point in time somewhere.

You might consider back to back steel angles tied down at the masonry for those cantilevers.
8ft. glass panels are HEAVY.

Beautiful interior by the way.
Ok, yeah those are the double 2x6 which are carrying the load of the roof down to the foundation. They are not close to the glass. The glass is completely uninterrupted. That's the thing, there is nothing supporting the glass! The glass is sitting on the butt end of the soft redwood siding which is only finish nailed to what little structure there is.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

I remeber now you mentioned that earlier.
I was only looking at the head then.

Pretty amazing.

Have you figured out what you are going to do on this issues come spring?

vortrex
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Post by vortrex »

It'll all get stripped back to the foundation wall and start over with the framing. I'll know specific details on that in the spring. For the window itself, I would like to use 1/2" insulated glass panels. The black seal will be visible where the glass meets, but this may be another one of those things where the pros outweigh the cons. With the existing single pane 1/4" the front window frosts up badly on the inside. I'm unsure what to use for the glass framing. My contractor is suggesting more a a commercial style for the insulating benefits but of course that will be more visible also. Using something similar to the existing aluminum L channel with the stops on the inside is the other option. Whatever is done, the window will be mounted to the structural framing and recessed slightly behind the roof line.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Do you know the architecture of Sigurd Lewerentz?

Tom
Posts: 3169
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Lewerentz
Last edited by Tom on Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

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