Wright's Textile Block patterns investigated

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JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

One wonders whether Mr. Wright had the opportunity to watch this movie -- possibly to screen it for the gang in the TWest theater on "Movie Night"?
But since info I've seen doesn't give the specific month of the movie's premier in 1959, it's not clear whether it would've been available before April. (I will now avoid making any haunted house wisecracks)

Among other things, the Wikipedia page about "House on Haunted Hill" asserts:

"Thanks in part to [producer/director William] Castle's gimmickry, the film was a huge success. Alfred Hitchcock took notice of the low-budget film's performance at the box office, and made his own low-budget horror film, which became the critically acclaimed hit Psycho (1960). Castle was himself a Hitchcock fan, and would try to imitate Hitchcock's work in later films such as Homicidal (1961)."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_on_Haunted_Hill

Reidy
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Post by Reidy »

The NYT reviewed it on March 12.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

Alrighty then. The resulting bit of trivia is that the tight window for FLW to see the haunted Ennis house on the silver screen was at precisely 29 days from its opening in "various neighborhood theaters".

Reidy
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Post by Reidy »

Maybe that's what killed him.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

(Laughing out loud (respectfully))

Rood
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Post by Rood »

JChoate wrote:"House on Haunted Hill " 1959
(by the way, that incinerator would be a good way to dispose of the bodies.)

Here's the whole movie. Not necessarily cinema at its finest, but well worth viewing from 1:25 to 2:04, then a good Ennis-laden stretch from 3:45 to 6:10. At the 6:10 mark things take a mysterious turn for the worse. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhUOuS0Gq6U .
Prior to joining the Fellowship, I took a part time job projecting films in our local theatre, just so i might have a skill that might be needed at Taliesin.

Of course, when I projected "House ..." I rewound the first reel and snipped out a couple of frames showing the Ennis House. I still have them stored between pages in the book A Testament

PS: Wouldn't you know, almost the moment I arrived at Taliesin West, I became the only trained projectionist in the Fellowship.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

Oh that's a good story.
I trust you place the film clippings bookmark in A Testament in between pages 148 & 149.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Must be an "inside" joke . . .

Hey, did you notice the light reflecting off of those stripes in the driveway ? Impressive. Must be some very regular joints in the paving . . .

https://media.gettyimages.com/photos/pe ... id52287963

Was there restoration work taking place in the 'fifties ?

SDR
Last edited by SDR on Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Rood
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Post by Rood »

JChoate wrote:Oh that's a good story.
I trust you place the film clippings bookmark in A Testament in between pages 148 & 149.
I haven't opened my copy of.A Testament in years, but, yes, I can confirm that three frames showing the Ennis House, from the now nearly 60 year-old B & W film "House On Haunted Hill..." are still lodged between pages 148 and 149.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

How did that work ? Does a projection booth usually have splicing station ? I suppose it might . . .

SDR

Rood
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Post by Rood »

SDR wrote:How did that work ? Does a projection booth usually have splicing station ? I suppose it might . . . SDR
Projection booths don't "might" have the ability to splice film, they "must" have it.

Once a reel of film broke half-way through the middle of the reel, as it was being projected. To ensure there would be no interruption in the viewer's experience, I had to let the film pile up on the floor, before changing over to the next reel. By the time of changeover, loose film a foot thick covered every inch of the floor, and it went out the door, trailing down the stairs towards the lobby.

Of course today things are probably far different ... I haven't been in a modern projection booth, but at one point all film stock began to be put on one big reel. Can't imagine the mess if one of them broke.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Ouch. Yes, I recall very occasionally seeing the big octagonal containers standing in the lobby of a theater, waiting I guess to be picked up and
delivered to the next place ?

I had a friend on the East Coast who was a small-time film-maker, recording producer, teacher, ex-band member. He had a pair of sixteen-mm
projectors in the living room, and a pull-down screen at the opposite end. Eventually he had a booth built, and a pair of 35s in place as well. Movie
night was fun. I convinced him to buy a print of "The Black Cat," a movie I'd fallen hard for in high school, watching the "Million Dollar Movie" on TV
after school. He found a print for a hundred bucks, and we watched it once, with a crowd. "Supernatural, perhaps -- baloney, perhaps not. There are
many things . . . under the sun !" (Big laugh . . .)

Owning those prints was apparently illegal; they were traded back and forth by collectors. The good old days ?

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

There are at least 5 movies titled "The Black Cat." I assume you meant the Boris Karloff/Bela Lugosi version of 1934, rather than Broderick Crawford's effort of 1941?

I saw HOHH in 1959. Once was enough.

(BTW: The Ennis gates are bronze, not wrought iron.)

SDR
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Post by SDR »

There's only one "TBC" in my catalog . . . !

"How could YOU do anything that wasn't entirely charming . . . ?" (Newlywed to his bride)

S

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

That book, the 1957 A Testament, holds special significance for me. Back in the 50's my father's close friend, college roommate, and best man at his wedding was an architecture student while my father studied engineering. Obviously a fan of FLW, his friend gave my dad a copy of the brand new book as a present. Years later, when I was in fifth grade I discovered that book on a shelf and was captivated, obsessed with the drawings and photos. Made me want to be an architect.

I still keep that book with me even though it is falling apart. Among its contents is THE photo of Rosenbaum. And many, many wonderful black & white reproductions of pencil drawings that set the imagination flying. Among my favorite drawings was the Ennis perspective which includes the floor plan (also in perspective) at the foot of the hill. Once I saw it I never forgot it.
It is grouped with plan & photo on pages 148 & 149.

Image

Image

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