Stuff to See in NYC?

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Matt
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Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:24 am

Stuff to See in NYC?

Post by Matt »

Looking forward to NYC in a few weeks. Suggestions on stuff to see? Highline. New Whitney. Other architectural gems? Are the Wright archives accessible, or are there plans to put them online?

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

The 9/11 Memorial site and Museum.

And, one place my wife and I thoroughly enjoyed was the Tenement Museum.


David

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Not that there is much to see of it, other than its street façade, an 1873 townhouse at 75-1/2 Bedford Street in Greenwich Village (NW of 7th Ave.) is interesting for three reasons:
1) At a width of only 9'6", interior 8'7", it is the narrowest house in NYC. A three-story house, with 999 sf of living space, it was squeezed into the carriage entrance of the neighboring 1799 house, the first house built in GV.
2) At one point in the 1920s, it was owned by poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. Later, the nearby Cherry Lane Theatre leased it to accommodate visiting actors, such as Cary Grant and John Barrymore. Later it was owned by anthropologist Margaret Mead.
3) As an example of how nuts Manhattan real estate has become, the house sold for $3.25M in 2013.

While the Millay House, as it is known, is currently the narrowest, the 1882 apartment house at Lexington and 82nd street, demolished in 1915, was 102' long, four stories high, and only 5' wide!

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

https://ny.curbed.com/2011/5/19/1046603 ... -3-million

http://thevillager.com/villager_54/narrowhousewide.html

No idea what "at its narrowest, it’s 2 ft. wide" could mean . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Imagine trying to build a house with that staircase these days.

markwiber
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Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:16 pm

Re: Stuff to See in NYC?

Post by markwiber »

Matt wrote: Are the Wright archives accessible, or are there plans to put them online? KitchenLola
I don't know of any plans to put them online but I think they're accessible to the public for viewing and scholarship. In fact there's an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art showcasing his work from June 12�October 1, 2017.
Last edited by markwiber on Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:43 am, edited 1 time in total.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Thank you, markwiber. Aside from the current Wright exhibition at MoMA, discussed elsewhere on this site, the Wright archive at the Avery Library at Columbia is available by appointment. Both resources are explained on this page:

http://library.columbia.edu/locations/a ... ction.html

SDR

Mod mom
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Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 11:00 am

Post by Mod mom »

We just came back from an art museum trip there. We spent a whole day at MOMA enjoying both there FLW archives exhibit, the Robert Rauschenberg Among Friends and their collection pieces...incredible. I would suggest eating on the 5th floor cafe, outside if possible (it was 96 when we were there) because the surrounding buildings are a treat! Cocktails in their outdoor sculpture garden is always enjoyable!

We spent another day on the Highline and the Whitney (where there is a wonderful Calder exhibit!) We purchased a book, "The Gardens of the High Line" which is a good read if you are interested in gardening.

Next we did the Guggenheim, which is always a delight! Then travelled to the Park Ave Armory for an interesting exhibit by Ai Weiwei and Herzog and De Meuron on the dystopian effects of surveillance.

I had never been to the Park Ave Armory...what a grand interior!
http://untappedcities.com/2016/04/04/in ... ue-armory/

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Gracious. What a room. I went to annual auto shows in Manhattan in the 'fifties, one of them at least at an armory. I wonder which one. This armory was the "Silk-stocking District's" local, combining social club and military installation. Too bad the Association of American Painters and Sculptors, who mounted the 1913 Armory Show, hadn't the foresight or fortune to be held here; perhaps the American Aesthetic Movement didn't sit well with the Ashcan School ?

But I've never seen the Tiffany/Herter/Kimbel/Roux/Millet space until today. So glad I could see it first in its newly-restored condition. This baby could have been the highlight of a paper on Tiffany I was assigned to research, in college . . . !

SDR

Reidy
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Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 3:30 pm
Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

The Austrian Cultural Forum by Raymond Abraham isn't as narrow as the buildings mentioned here, but it's much taller: 25 feet x 24 stories.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

A difficult building to represent; here are some more images.

http://www.hiddenarchitecture.net/2016/ ... forum.html

jay
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Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

For fans of landscape design, Prospect Park stands as perhaps Olmsted's best preserved masterpiece.... Enter the park through Grand Army Plaza, and walk through Endale Arch, as it leads you into the Long Meadow....

The author of this article describes the walk on pages 392-393:
https://newenglandquarterly.files.wordp ... design.pdf

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

If you like jazz, St. Peter's Lutheran Church at 54th and Lexington features free concerts. The church, by Vignelli Assoc., built in the early70s at the base of Hugh Stubbins' tower for (what is now) Citibank, has a chapel with a wall-sized sculpture by Louise Nevelson, open all day, every day, free.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

The tower was apparently designed to leave room for an existing church on the site; its replacement is the building Roderick cites -- as I understand it. This tower is the one which required emergency structural amendment . . .

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_ ... orism.html

http://o-l-i.blogspot.com/2013/04/what- ... llion.html

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The church lot was occupied by a 19th century church for the same congregation with the same jazz program. When the original tower client tried to buy the lot, the church cut a deal to have the current structure built, which resulted in the design of the tower making way for the new church. What other financial benefits the church received beyond the new church, I don't know, though probably enough to keep the doors open in that pricey neighborhood.

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