FLW Unbuilt Designs for Madison

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Roderick Grant
Posts: 10573
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The cone is not entirely hollow. There seem to be trusses supporting the cone, and possibly a ceiling with a perimeter following the cone at a lower pitch and a flat circle in the middle about half way up the cone. But the drawing isn't finished enough to know for sure.

Leaving the arcade open would not be an option in any sort of malignant effort. This scheme, if built, will be for year-around use in order to amortize the cost, whereas the boat house would have stood unused during the winter. It is just a bad idea all around.

SDR
Posts: 20198
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

By way of context, 1893, the date of these Mendota Boathouse projects, is the year that the arcaded campus of Stanford University, by Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, was opened.

https://www.usnews.com/img/college-photo_385.jpg


Image

For my money, the Roman arch(es) resting on columns, the mono-material construction, and the pitched roofs speak to Wright's wooden monument more than do Sullivan's version of those forms . . . ?

SDR
Last edited by SDR on Tue Jun 20, 2017 8:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.

JChoate
Posts: 995
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 4:29 pm
Location: Atlanta
Contact:

Post by JChoate »


RonMcCrea
Posts: 331
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:10 pm
Location: Madison, Wisconsin

Post by RonMcCrea »

I've come up with a catchy term for Wright-inspired and posthumously constructed buildings: Frank Lloyd Light.

JChoate
Posts: 995
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 4:29 pm
Location: Atlanta
Contact:

Post by JChoate »

Those Stanford arches are great.

Much is owed to HH Richardson, in the 1870's & 80's:
https://www.oakesameshall.org/oakes-ame ... omanesque/

Conical roof:
http://openbuildings.com/buildings/emma ... file-25029

... and as an aside, as Richardonian arches go, they don't get much bolder than this one:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Egv7Y8CJ0-A/U ... eLodge.jpg
Last edited by JChoate on Tue Jun 20, 2017 9:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

SDR
Posts: 20198
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Heh. Again, we veer in the direction of Frank Furness -- though he was as likely to employ the pointed arch as the round one ?

SDR

JChoate
Posts: 995
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 4:29 pm
Location: Atlanta
Contact:

Post by JChoate »

Furness is fascinating, and not discussed enough. I'd like to know more about his work, never having seen any in person. Somewhere on a shelf I have a Furness book...
I heard an anecdote from a history professor when I was a student that Furness (a fiery redhead) would occasionally shoot a pistol from one end of his studio to the opposite wall to blow off a little steam and relieve stress. His draughtsmen learned to duck.
Maybe we should explore Furness a little more ....

http://furnesque.tumblr.com/tagged/Frank-Furness

SDR
Posts: 20198
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Wow, what a trove. I believe our DRN is a Furness man, as well . . .


The 1886 Dr Thomas Skinner house, in Philly (mid-page), is a miracle in red. Mr Wright, eat your heart out ?

S

DRN
Posts: 4044
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

The link James noted has some good examples, I also like Furness' "hard core" work that those of "good taste" could not allow to survive the early to mid 20th century:

http://frankfurness.org/wp-content/uplo ... ublic3.jpg

http://frankfurness.org/wp-content/uplo ... ublic3.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/hspvsketchbook.files. ... op=1&ssl=1
(the church survives but the corner tower was removed)

Some of the few survivors:

The 1876 gatehouse at the Philly Zoo that I liked when I was a little kid:
http://www.theconstitutional.com/sites/ ... ne2010.jpg

The one I wrote letters and signed petitions about when I was in high school (Drexel University bought and restored it as their alumni center):
http://www.phillyliving.com/images/blog ... et1963.jpg

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/fcsarch ... 1201003616

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10573
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion by Furness has placed a rose window in a most curious location. Apparently that is not a belfry. Perhaps an airborne Baptistery?

JChoate
Posts: 995
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2016 4:29 pm
Location: Atlanta
Contact:

Post by JChoate »

Mmmm ... those are witty and brawny, masterpieces all.
Those were the days... when buildings could be so substantial, look and be so heavy and solid. Looking plausibly permanent.
Years ago I visited the house Victor Horta designed for himself in Brussels (an Art Nouveau thing). Framed on the wall was an elevation drawing at a scale large enough for every piece of curvy limestone on its façade to be identified by number where, presumably, they were drawn even larger elsewhere and dimensioned in order to know how to fabricate them. No two pieces of stone appeared to be the same shape.

Wouldn't it be great to see the Furness's construction drawings for that wonderful bank façade? What a jewel.

SDR
Posts: 20198
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes -- the bank front shown in half a dozen images, both drawings and photos ? Oh, to work in the days of "real material." Now we deal in skins, mostly.

What forms are natural to skins ? For that matter, were Horta's or Furness's pieces of stone "natural," beyond being capable of manufacture from the raw material ? Is the making and assembling of a computer-drawn and CNC-fabricated skin more of a miracle than is the hand-drawing, hewing, dressing and laying of blocks of stone ?

SDR

Macrodex
Posts: 236
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 2:11 pm

Post by Macrodex »

Furness' drawing of a flower helped to inspire Sullivan's ornament, iirc.

He's [Furness] is not as appreciated as he should be.

Tom
Posts: 3217
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Never knew that Monona Terrace had towers planned for it.
They don't look Wright to me.
The same guy that did the tower at JWax
and the one in Bartlesville
did not do those towers.

Rood
Posts: 1189
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Tom wrote:Never knew that Monona Terrace had towers planned for it.
They don't look Wright to me. The same guy that did the tower at JWax
and the one in Bartlesville did not do those towers.
I'm afraid Wright did design those towers, Tom.

I have a Minneapolis Sunday Tribune newspaper article (with photo) from the era, dated 13 February 1955,, showing the model as first displayed in Madison ... "last week".

The headline reads:

Frank Lloyd Wright Wows Madison With Lakeshore Auditorium Plans

The text reads in part: The roofs, at street level, are flower gardens, but the gardens can be sacrified, Wright says, to make room for a couple of silo-like skyscrapers, 14-24 stories high "If you wish," usable as hotels, offices, shops or restaurants.

"It's organic architecture, with which I've always been identified," he said. "It's almost free of ornamentation or other monkeydoodle business. There's no waste motion.

"And when they start telling you how expensive this is going to be, just smile ... because it isn't so. This is metal, steel, and glass construction ... standardized and very simple."

Post Reply