Wood finish recommendations for a wood clad FLW House

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Roderick Grant
Posts: 10208
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Even Ipe comes in 30 species. It's also from South America, which undoubtedly adds to the expense.

SDR
Posts: 19468
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Houses made entirely of teak are common, apparently, where the wood grows. Like the common Ipe that's sold here, it has grit in the wood which dulls tooling more rapidly than other woods. I assume that "sand" is drawn up into the tree along with water from the ground.

Teak would make an excellent cladding, I imagine. I've forgotten what I've been told about when and why Scandinavian furniture-makers added teak to their palette . . .

SDR

Mod mom
Posts: 389
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 11:00 am

Post by Mod mom »

Having just purchased a lot of wood, we learned something from the deliverymen that we never knew, and I thought I'd share. In purchasing plywood for the entire house, we wanted wood from a single source and top grade (don't like knotty plywood). Previously I mentioned we were unable to acquire Douglas Fir in the quantity we needed and the grade we wanted, so we went with birch, which we learned from our previous house darkens to a warmer, deeper tone with age. Anyway, our birch was from Spain and the driver informed us that raw material is loaded on board a ship and the boards are manufactured into plywood as it crosses the ocean. We never knew this, before.

Also, I'm using a beeswax/mineral oil product to seal my soapstone and discovered it is meant to seal wood (as in salad bowls). I just used it on a hand carved platter that we purchased from a Shaker Village that we stayed at in Kentucky. Would a product like this is a good solution for sealing exterior wood? I used food grade, but for that use it wouldn't matter.

SDR
Posts: 19468
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Thanks, Mod mom. The answer to your question is "probably not." Waxes are typically vulnerable to water infiltration; you've seen water rings on furniture, I'm sure. (One old remedy for these is the application of mayonnaise or other oils, to displace the trapped moisture.)

If the addition of mineral oil somehow changes the equation so that moisture cannot penetrate, very well. Let us know what experimentation reveals . . .

SDR

Tim
Posts: 330
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 4:52 pm

Post by Tim »

Were there ever midstream restoration or final images posted?

SDR
Posts: 19468
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Tim, if you mean work at Glenbrow, Mod mom has presented us with many photos over the last several years. Look at her Profile (bottom of each post) for a list of individual posts . . .

S

Post Reply