Article: Joseph H. Dodson & the Bradley House

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outside in
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Post by outside in »

at the turn of the century, shops like Giannini and Hilgart employed over 100 artisans to manufacture art glass for the residential and commercial market. There were separate groups - some glass cutters, others cut caming, and finally there were the group of assembly people. All the work was done on large tables, almost a production line. I have a feeling this was nothing more than a mistake, and like most things of artistic value, one tends to attach meaning to it.

Tom
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Post by Tom »

On the other hand I am saying that I think it is possible that this was a "flaw" ... in the consistency of Wright's behavior.
Yes, indeed, it's kind of cheesy but hey ____ happens.
How old was he when he built this house?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

He was 33 at the turn of the century -- so, 33.

I recently performed the exercise of determining Wright's age at each of the decades of his career, as follows; I used it in conjunction with knowledge of what he was doing at each of the steps on his personal ladder:

1887 - 20
1897 - 30
1907 - 40
1917 - 50
1927 - 60
1937 - 70
1947 - 80
1957 - 90


SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Wow - that's great.
Thanks for posting.

He wasn't all that young when he did Bradley.
Do you, or anybody else, know what house first used the tiled red square as signature?

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Never mind
I found the Red Tile Signature thread on this site.

Tom
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Post by Tom »

But it makes me wonder when he began to use the red square on his drawings.
Got any clue about that?

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Well, looks like the red square, with circle and cross, were used when he first began independent practice.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Yes. See two early building "signatures" here

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewto ... 8ed5968f0f

I don't know of a single collection of such photos -- something else for the scholars to work on ?

The earliest use of a red square on a drawing, found in a cursory scan of Taschen, is on a plan of Taliesin I, in 1911. The square is surrounded by a thin black line, spaced perhaps 10% the size of the square itself. I imagine that the cross-in-square adorned some earlier drawings; it would be interesting to know where Wright might have found a precedent for that figure.

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Found this. See: Figure 1
Interesting office hours.

http://www.bauarchitecture.com/docs/Red%20Square.pdf

SDR
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Post by SDR »

"and was defined by the idea of integral ornament being the pattern of nature made visibly articulate and expressed as the inner rhythm of form." (quoted by the author from "The Natural House")


Heh. If you mean "Ornament of stylized and abstracted natural form, applied in accordance with the building module," why not say "Ornament of stylized and abstracted natural form, applied in accordance with the building module" ?


During that period, Wright would travel between Oak Park and the city twice a day, in order to meet with clients in both places.

SDR

Iowegian63
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Post by Iowegian63 »

SDR wrote:
I found it interesting that the colors of the "flowers" in the Bradley windows apparently varied from one set to another -- see page one of thread. I don't recall Wright employing an identical design but altering the glass color, as here, in windows in another project.

S
Wright did a similar thing at Hollyhock house...the accent glass in the windows on the south side is green, the accent glass on the north side is purple. never see them together really and after docenting there for two years I have never noticed until it was pointed out to me.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

regarding early red squares, there's this drawing.
I don't know if this drawing (looking like Marion Mahoney's) was done in 1904, or if the title was done later, or what.
Didn't FLW go back and annotate his earlier work sometimes?
(this lettering, and signature, and red square look like it could be something from the 30's onward rather than early Prairie years)

Image

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

This 1908 Boynton:

Image

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks for those, Jim. I have seen many Wright scribbles and other penciled notes (not in ink, thank heaven -- though no one would think of erasing them !) on finished drawings (as on the Boynton drawing). He seemed not to view these sheets as objects of value. I'd be very surprised to see evidence of "faking" an earlier style, in these annotations (or for any other reason). I haven't seen that at all, before now.

You might be onto something, though, considering that Gale lettering style ? Look at contemporary drawings, for lettering.

Would you look at Darwin Martin, in your latest Monograph, for photos or drawings of the "wigwam" double-sided fireplace ? I'm trying to figure out what those tall metal posts are meant to be, or to do . . .

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Apparently in his abbreviated initialed signatures he used LL for Lloyd and not merely L.

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