Article: Laurie Virr's House 'Rivendell' - Canberra, AU

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peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Maybe someone from the Conservancy could connect you to Mr. Silver or his contractor(s)?

Are there elevations and or sections to share?

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

The elevations were posted on the previous page.

S

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

I was thinking interiors.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Joel wouldn't be much of an asset in your search for a contractor. Auldbrass is in the very southernmost tip of S. Carolina.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Bill provides Laurie's section drawings of Bill's house. I'm not presently permitted to add them to the plan sheet on the previous page, so here are the sections (at the largest size available) and plans, together.



Image



ImageImage

Design and drawings © Copyright 2017 by Laurie Virr, Architect

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Always looking for ways to "improve" the work of others -- yes, even of the finest designers -- I propose a trivial adjustment to Laurie's delightful plan. Can you find it ?



Image

JChoate
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Contact:

Post by JChoate »

I'm interested, or maybe confused, with the section note regarding the roofing. It's identified as a membrane by Sarnafil. I'm familiar with Sarnafil as a pretty sophisticated membrane system, typically a thermoplastic membrane for low slope applications for rather large commercial/industrial buildings, typically unseen from ground level.
http://usa.sarnafil.sika.com/en/solutions_products.html

Looking at their product offerings, they appear to have a version suited for visibility from ground level with higher pitch -- maybe this one simulating a metal roof (?):
http://usa.sarnafil.sika.com/en/solutio ... -roof.html

But, the elevations don't indicate the texture of simulated standing seams, so perhaps the intention is to appear monolithic (?).

Either way, there would need to be intentional detailing of the drip edge of the roof (during which the outer edge of the plywood decking would be terminated and covered). I've not seen a membrane system on a pitched roof used in this way. That's a product usually installed by a type of subcontractor that might be difficult to find for a quantity of roof so much smaller than they're used to. As far as I've noticed, that's the most exotic component.

ozwrightfan
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Location: Sydney Australia

Post by ozwrightfan »

The angled construction joint in the slab running to the left hand side of the fireplace.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Bingo. Makes more sense to me that way -- but I feel sure Laurie will have a reason for his choice.

Another interesting feature of the design is that the brick walls of the bathroom element continue above the bedroom to unite with the chimney mass. Even at
a single wythe for these panels the load would presumably require a hefty pair of beams. I wonder if the bedroom ceiling is divided into three planes, the
central one the width of the span between those beams. Section C-C would answer that question.

SDR

Sorry for the extra-wide page, the result of my side-by-side plans posted earlier.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

The sequence of experiences as one moves into and through this house deserves note. One would walk under a canopy from the garage to the front door and the entry vestibule, where a small skylight far above sheds natural down-light. Left
is the bathroom, closed to the outside like the vestibule but generously skylighted; to the right is the bedroom, where two slot windows flank the opening to the space, while another large linear skylight showers the central chimney mass against
which is placed the head of the bed.

The diagonal centerline of the square-plan house is clear, bringing emphasis to those elements which depart from the diagonal symmetry. Looking up, light and space flow around the masonry mass, while everywhere around the perimeter flows
a light deck, not far above one's head. Visual movement to the left of the centerline is blocked below the deck by a wardrobe cabinet, so one moves to the right into the kitchen space, and thence, drawn by the first view of the exterior through a
large opening in the corner beyond, into the largest volume, terminating past the large fireplace in a cozy nook with built-in seating and a closed exterior wall. Above all is the tent-like ceiling, continuous light-colored planes invisibly lighted at the
perimeter, its distance from the eye thus a matter of mystery, expanding the space to an indeterminate degree.


Details of the skylights appear to answer my previous question about the bedroom ceiling . . .


Image

Design and drawing © Copyright 2017 by Laurie Virr, Architect

HOJO
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Location: Belgium

Post by HOJO »

Section E-E: I would continue both walls and the insulated cavity above the roof to the wall tops: better insulation in the corner of wall and ceiling and a less risky support of the thicker wall above the insulation on a thinner wall.

Plan: weird sequence from the entry, through a bedroom, through the kitchen, to the living room ?

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

As to the plan, certain sacrifices are necessary in the rustic hut ? Wright and the Wrightians are always willing to reduce footage as a trade-off for the real luxuries: ample roofs (outside and in), good material, true form ?
Not an inch is wasted on passageways in this simple house. I assume the client was on board with these choices . . .

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

So, now we're lacking only a look at the carport -- surely a sweet little Organic temple of its own ? -- a section perhaps through the walkway
cover, and the section labeled C-C on the plan.

Here's the carport plan again. The two roofs are intriguing; can't wait to see what's happening there. Note the architect manipulating his
double-wythe brickwork to present thicknesses as desired at wall terminations.




Image

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

We've been talking about new "rustic huts" -- minimal dwellings for today. Here's a different sort of "organic" ?

https://www.dezeen.com/2017/03/04/rock- ... el_block_1

The differences between this little house -- we don't see a plan, unfortunately -- and Laurie's house for Bill Buck, are too numerous to name. What do they have in common, if anything ?

SDR

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

The floor plan of this design challenges us to look beyond bourgeois notions of manners and taboos. Just as Wright and other modernists questioned the necessity of a formal dining room, attic, parlor, etc., Laurie challenges our notion of privacy.

In medieval times, the nobility entertained guests in their bedrooms, so presentation was very important. The bedroom was a very public place. The taboo surrounding the space did not exist. Bill Buck will be greeting his guests in his bedroom. This is the most interesting conceptual aspect of the design to me. I wonder if there was much discussion about this unusual aspect or if it was merely a practical concern, maximizing square footage?

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